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Dairy stakeholders praise FDA ruling on UF milk use in cheese

August 18, 2017

WASHINGTON — Dairy stakeholders are commending the leadership of FDA for granting enforcement discretion for the use and labeling of ultrafiltered (UF) milk in all standardized cheeses and related cheese products covered by the federal standards of identity.

FDA in Monday’s Federal Register announced the availability of a guidance to advise manufacturers who wish to use UF milk or UF nonfat milk in the production of standardized cheeses and related cheese products. In the guidance, FDA says it intends to exercise enforcement discretion regarding the use and labeling of UF milk and UF nonfat milk in cheeses when used in addition to the dairy ingredients specified in the standards of identity.

UF milk is milk that has been filtered to remove some of the water and lactose, which increases the protein content while reducing total fluid volume. The use of UF milk increases efficiency in cheesemaking, enhances cheese yield for cheesemakers and allows for fewer trucks on the roads, which reduces transportation costs. It is also responsive to many dairy consumers’ desire for environmentally-friendly and sustainable production practices, stakeholders say.

While FDA is encouraging cheese manufacturers to identify fluid UF milk and fluid UF nonfat milk on product labels when feasible and appropriate, FDA makes clear in its guidance that it does not intend to take action against companies that do not declare these items on ingredient statements. However, milk or nonfat milk still must be declared in the ingredient statement.

This guidance stems from a proposed rule on the use of fluid UF milk in cheese manufacturing that first was issued in 2005 but has not been completed due to competing priorities. FDA says it intends to exercise enforcement discretion until it has completed its rulemaking process or has decided not to proceed with the rulemaking.

FDA also notes it is taking this action now due to issues regarding domestically-produced UF milk in the international marketplace that have resulted in oversupply and pricing challenges.

Additionally, FDA has received requests to exercise enforcement discretion while its rulemaking is pending, in part to mitigate the impact on U.S. companies producing UF milk.

FDA invites electronic or written comments on the guidance at any time. Comments may be submitted at www.regulations.gov.

The Wisconsin Cheese Makers Association (WCMA) praised the announcement, noting the dairy industry has been seeking approval for this natural dairy ingredient in cheesemaking for nearly 20 years.

“FDA’s announcement is an important win for Wisconsin and other great cheesemaking states,” says John Umhoefer, executive director, WCMA.

Umhoefer notes FDA’s decision will allow cheesemakers to use this natural, concentrated form of milk in cheesemaking with flexible labeling restrictions, and the decision will open the door for Wisconsin and other states to produce and market more fresh, UF milk to cheesemakers across the nation.

“There’s been an oversupply of milk in the U.S. for over a year, causing real financial stress for dairy farm families,” he says. “This decision can lead to more production of fluid ultrafiltered milk and find new markets for our abundant milk supplies.”

The dairy industry has been working with FDA for nearly two decades to allow the use of UF milk in cheeses with a federal standard of identity — such as Cheddar, Mozzarella, Colby and Brick, Umhoefer notes.

“It’s more practical and economical to ship this liquid, filtered milk to cheesemakers, other dairy manufacturers and even food processors in this concentrated form,” he says.

FDA has allowed the use of fluid UF milk in standardized cheeses if the filtration took place at the cheese factory where natural cheese was made, and the agency has issued three exceptions to allow for the use of UF milk over the years. For example, in 2005, the agency allowed for the use of fluid UF milk in Swiss cheese manufacture.

Umhoefer says FDA’s announcement means that UF milk can be brought in as a natural dairy ingredient to make any natural cheese, provided that the physical, chemical and flavor properties of the cheese are not affected.

FDA’s discretion on labeling will give cheesemakers the flexibility to use or not use this ingredient without needing redundant packaging materials noting this milk ingredient, he adds.

The International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) also praised FDA’s announcement.

“On behalf of our member companies, I would like to thank Scott Gottlieb, FDA commissioner, and Stephen Ostroff, M.D., deputy commissioner of food and veterinary medicine, for taking a common-sense approach to a long-standing regulatory burden on dairy foods companies,” says Michael Dykes, IDFA president and CEO.

Dykes says FDA’s announcement will allow the cheese industry to use UF milk more widely and will streamline the existing complex labeling requirements. This guidance will not affect the use and labeling of UF milk in fluid milk and other dairy products, he notes.

“Today’s action by FDA falls squarely within the philosophy of the current administration to reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens,” Dykes says. “After lagging for more than two decades, it is good to see the regulations on the use of UF milk are catching up with this safe and sustainable production technology, which is already used around the world.”

IDFA says it will work with FDA as it accepts input on a final rule that will allow the use of UF milk in all cheeses.

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) notes it previously has supported the use of fluid UF milks in standardized cheeses and views this development as a positive step forward.

“Although FDA’s announcement is considered ‘guidance’ and does not have the full effect of a regulatory final rule, it provides a strong sense of the agency’s current perspective on the issue,” says Jim Mulhern, president and CEO, NMPF. “The FDA announcement mentioned the impact of ‘recent changes in some export markets’ — a reference to the loss of U.S. ultrafiltered milk exports to Canada. NMPF has been working with the U.S. Dairy Export Council, IDFA and others in asking the Executive Branch of the government to help remedy the recent loss of UF exports. This announcement is a timely and welcome response to those efforts.”

To view the guidance, visit www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatory
Information/ucm571090.htm.

CMN


Curds serve as signature
squeaky snack, ingredient

August 18, 2017

Editor’s Note: “Cheese of the Month” is Cheese Market News’ exclusive profile series exploring various cheese types. Each month, CMN highlights a different cheese in this feature, giving our readers a comprehensive look at production, marketing, sales and in-depth aspects of each profiled cheese type. Please read on to learn about this month’s featured cheese: Curds.

By Stephanie Awe

MADISON, Wis. — Cheese curds are a beloved snack among many consumers and are growing in popularity in some U.S. regions. Whether fresh or fried, they serve a variety of snackable applications.

Typically, cheese curds are made from Cheddar cheese, although they can be made from other cheeses such as Muenster and Brick, according to Mark Johnson, Ph.D., assistant director at the Wisconsin Center for Dairy Research (CDR). Curds made of Cheddar are created through the same process used to make Cheddar cheese, but instead of being formed and pressed into a cheese block, the curds are kept separate. In addition, all curds — no matter what cheese variety they are made from — must be produced using milled curd.

Cheddar curds typically are higher in moisture than Cheddar, and they are salted right away, Johnson says. While curds do not have a standard of identity, curds with “Cheddar” on their labels must abide by FDA’s federal regulations for Cheddar cheese, he adds.

Curds usually are served fresh or breaded. When curds are breaded, a coating — such as a starch solution — typically is applied to the outside of each curd so that the crumbs and spices stick before the curds are frozen and fried, Johnson says.

Fresh curds are known for producing a squeak. According to a CDR study in which Johnson was involved, the protein in a fresh curd — casein — is tightly knit, connected by a high number of calcium phosphate molecules. As teeth bite into the cheese, they compress the protein network and cause it to resist and rebound, creating the characteristic squeak.

As cheese ages, the acid in the cheese from the cheesemaking process slowly breaks down the calcium phosphate bonds, meaning the cheese eventually loses its squeak, the study says.
In addition, proteolysis — the breakdown of protein — begins to occur because the rennet added during the cheesemaking process “attacks” protein, Johnson says. This breakdown eventually changes the structure in the cheese, which also causes the cheese to lose its squeak, he says.

However, the squeak typically can be restored when the curds are refrigerated for up to two weeks and then heated for 15 seconds in the microwave, according to the CDR study. The study also examined frozen curds, freezing them for up to three months. The curd’s squeak returned after the curd was frozen for up to three months and refrigerated for up to an additional two weeks, and then heated up for 15 seconds in the microwave. Warming the cheese in these situations forces the protein molecules to interact more closely, recreating the curd’s ability to squeak, the study says.

• Retail sales

Annual cheese curd volume retail sales were at 5.1 million pounds in the latest 52 weeks as of July 9, 2017, which was down 2.1 percent from last year (total U.S. multi-outlet and convenience stores, fixed weight only), according to data from Information Resources Inc. (IRI) courtesy of Dairy Management Inc. Total U.S. sales, however, grew each year from 2013 to 2016.

Prices of cheese curds fluctuate throughout the year and were up 3 percent in July from a year ago, with an average price of $7.52 per pound, according to the IRI data.

When looking at cheese curd volume sales over eight national geographic locations, the Great Lakes region sells the most, accounting for 59 percent. This is followed by the Plains region. Meanwhile, California and the West show the most growth, according to the data.

Cheddar is the top cheese curd variety sold in both U.S. multi-outlet and convenience stores, with Mozzarella and Farmer cheese varieties also placing high in multi-outlet stores and Monterey Jack ranking high in convenience stores (fixed weight only, latest 52 weeks as of July 16, 2017), the data says. In addition, plain curds have a 70-percent share of volume sales, with the top flavors falling mostly along the hot profile, according to IRI.

Cheese curds especially see an increase in retail sales around the Fourth of July holiday, with other spikes occurring during Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays as well as Super Bowl Sunday, according to the data.

• A variety of offerings

Various cooperatives and companies offer curds but take different approaches to selling the cheese.

Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Ellsworth, Wisconsin, carries both flavored and unflavored Cheddar cheese curds. In its own retail stores, Ellsworth experiments with different varieties and package sizes. It also distributes curds for retail in Plain, Cajun, Taco, Garlic and Hot Buffalo in 1-pound, 2-ounce and 5-ounce sizes; and, for foodservice, it conducts direct distribution, shipping whichever curd flavors the customer orders in 5- and 40-pound packages, says Paul Bauer, CEO, Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery. Its curds are sold to customers in all 50 states as well as internationally.

Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery’s curds were a significant factor in the Wisconsin governor recognizing the Village of Ellsworth as the “Cheese Curd Capital of Wisconsin” in the early 1980s, and to this day the cooperative strives to continually innovate its curds. Starting as a butter and powder plant before stepping into cheese production, Ellsworth’s curds now continue to grow in popularity. The cooperative works with consultants on staff to help ensure its curd flavor profiles and characteristics meet customer needs. It also strives to maintain a process that produces a clean- and fresh-flavored curd that allows for a shelf life of six or more months, Bauer says, noting that the curds maintain their squeak in this time with a little care, although the squeak is always best in a fresh curd.

“We’re trying to be innovative within our field and with our product,” Bauer says.

At Arena Cheese Inc. in Arena, Wisconsin, the company offers traditional, handmade Cheddar curds with a shelf life lasting just days. While unflavored is the company’s most popular curd variety, it also offers flavors such as Garlic and Herb, Dill, Vegetable, Cajun and Buffalo Wing, along with other customized flavors for customers, says Bill Hanson, vice president, Arena Cheese. The company offers curds in 12-ounce retail packs and does bulk sales in bags between 10 and 20 pounds.

The company’s marketing strategy is built around freshness and, as such, its curd sales are very localized, Hanson says. The curds, made daily Monday through Friday, are mainly available in Arena Cheese’s retail store and are sold through local farmers markets and a couple of other distribution channels that offer fresh curds.

Arena’s curds are a small portion of the business; Hanson notes that the company’s intent for its curds is to help bring more people into its cheese store. The company’s curds are handmade and labor intensive, and producing larger volumes would require the company to invest more in the process, Hanson says.

Meanwhile, Tillamook in Tillamook, Oregon, offers unbreaded yellow and white Cheddar curds that are made fresh in small batches several times per week, according to Abby Kempf, assistant category manager, Tillamook. Its curds are sold in Tillamook and are available for online purchase.

“Curds are best consumed fresh to get that signature ‘squeak,’” Kempf says.

• Applications, trends

Whether fresh or fried, cheese curds have many utilizations.

Curds, when fresh, traditionally are served as a snack, Hanson says. Exemplifying curds’ easy snackability, he says Arena Cheese staff and customers joke that the customer will need to buy two bags, because one bag will be eaten on their way home.

Similarly, Kempf notes that Tillamook’s cheese curd consumption has grown over the past several years, due in part to their alignment with snacking trends.

“Snacking, specifically wholesome, protein-focused and on-the-go snacking, is a continuing trend we see in the market. Cheese curds are the perfect solution for this occasion. It’s also a snack that appeals to all ages,” she says. “Additionally, the rising popularity of poutine in U.S. restaurants has likely broadened consumer awareness of curds.”

In addition, she says Tillamook staff suggest topping tomato soup with a few curds or coating them in tempura batter and frying them before serving with chipotle ranch. A Tillamook cheesemaker also suggests sprinkling curds with dill to make them extra savory, Kempf adds.

Bauer notes that Ellsworth’s curds are expected to become ingredients in other products, such as smoked brats and pizza applications.

At the end of July and into early August, Ellsworth conducted its first production run of breaded cheese curds using Hot Buffalo, Bold Buttermilk and Beer Battered flavors, which went “very well,” Bauer says. With Ellsworth’s primary targets for this product being restaurants and foodservice chains, the cooperative distributed the curds during the first full week of August.

“We’re always looking to keep inventing new ways to meet our customers’ needs,” Bauer says.

CMN


NAFTA renegotiation begins;
industry spotlights priorities

August 18, 2017

WASHINGTON — Trade representatives from the United States, Canada and Mexico met this week to begin an official renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The renegotiation provides the Trump administration with an opportunity to fulfill one of the president’s top campaign promises — a reset of the U.S. trade agenda.

The talks, which will conclude Sunday, are taking place between chief negotiators John Melle, assistant U.S. trade representative for the western hemisphere; Ken Smith Ramos, director of the Trade and NAFTA Office at the Embassy of Mexico in Washington; and Steve Verheul, chief trade negotiator for Canada.

“We all agree that NAFTA needs updating,” U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in opening remarks this week. “This is a 23-year-old agreement, and our economies are very different than they were in the 1990s. We need to modernize or create provisions which protect digital trade and services trade, e-commerce, update customs procedures, protect intellectual property, improve energy provisions, enhance transparency rules and promote science-based agricultural trade.”

The International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) says maintaining the U.S. dairy industry’s export market in Mexico is the No. 1 priority for the organization in the renegotiation. IDFA also has pushed for the negotiators to use NAFTA to address problems with Canada’s use of new milk pricing policies that undercut skim milk powder prices on the international market, to eliminate steep tariffs and to seek greater dairy market access to the country.

IDFA says it will take full advantage of any opportunities to engage with negotiators and the Office of USTR to ensure that the priorities of the U.S. dairy industry are addressed as the talks progress.

IDFA notes that in the 90-day period since plans to negotiate the agreement were announced, the organization has met with Lighthizer, congressional leaders and senior members of the Trump administration to stress dairy’s NAFTA negotiation priorities. IDFA also has represented dairy in a USTR roundtable discussion on NAFTA and trade policy; urged NAFTA negotiators to address IDFA’s trade priorities in renegotiation talks; and submitted written testimony to the Senate Agriculture Committee that highlights dairy’s priorities in NAFTA.

Michael Dykes, IDFA president and CEO, joined leaders from the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) and the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) on a trip to Mexico in March to reassure Mexican government officials of the U.S. industry’s commitment to the existing strong trade relationship between the countries.

National Farmers Union (NFU) President Roger Johnson this week urged the Trump administration to restore balanced trade and domestic sovereignty that have been traded away in past agreements, noting NFU has long supported a transition to a fair trade framework.

“For decades, farming and rural communities across the country have suffered lost jobs, lowered wages, and fleeting economic liberty as a result of our nation’s free trade agenda,” Johnson says.

“The Trump administration must use this opportunity to reset that agenda by instituting a new, fair trade framework that works for family farmers, ranchers and rural residents. NFU urges them to do so in a fashion that is transparent to the American public and does not upset the positive trade relations the U.S. agriculture community relies upon.”

The American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), The Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) and Mexico’s Consejo Nacional Agropecuario (CNA) this week sent a joint letter to Canadian, U.S. and Mexican government officials reiterating their calls that NAFTA re-negotiations should aim to modernize the agreement, rather than dismantle it.

AFBF, CFA and CNA agree that agriculture represents one of NAFTA’s biggest success stories. Agricultural reciprocal trade between the three countries has grown exponentially since the agreement was implemented more than 20 years ago.

In their discussions, the three presidents agreed on the need to build on the original agreement’s success by looking for ways to increase trade volumes.

“When it comes to overall positive results for North America’s farmers and ranchers, NAFTA has proved itself as a solid foundation for trade,” says Zippy Duvall, AFBF president. “Just as farmers have new tools and technology for food and fiber production, we believe that an updated NAFTA agreement can help the three nations become even stronger trading partners.”

Meanwhile, NMPF this week released a statement on comments that Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland made in a speech Monday.

In her speech, Freeland said her country is committed to protecting its supply management system in NAFTA negotiations, signaling Canada intends to take a hard line with the U.S. industry.

“In her speech to Parliament today, Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland seems to want it both ways — free trade with the United States in areas where Canada is competitive, but high protectionist walls when it comes to keeping out U.S. dairy imports,” NMPF says. “Moreover, Minister Freeland’s comments Monday about the dairy trade elements of the upcoming NAFTA talks are completely misleading.”

NMPF says that for too long, Canada has relied on government controls on farm milk production to boost prices, while minimizing dairy imports to limit competition. By comparison, the United States has slashed its government involvement in dairy markets, and relies on exporting its products to global customers to a greater degree than ever before.

“That’s why the United States and other major dairy exporting nations, including Mexico and Argentina, are so upset with Canada’s latest Class 7 pricing scheme that is designed to undercut world market prices and unfairly dump Canada’s surplus milk at the expense of the United States and other exporters,” NMPF says. “Ironically, Canada’s so-called ‘supply management’ system is failing to manage supply. Despite having no domestic market for more milk solids, the government there has sharply increased farm level production quotas, resulting in an accompanying spike of almost 300 percent in Canadian milk powder exports in 2017 so far. These exports are only made possible because Canada manipulates domestic pricing through the Class 7 subsidy scheme.

“Canada cannot be allowed to maintain a system that establishes one of the highest milk prices in the world within its borders while using world markets as a dumping ground for a huge increase in its production,” NMPF adds.

NMPF says while Canada has the right to choose its own domestic farm policies, it doesn’t have the right to use those policy tools to manipulate global dairy markets to the benefit of its dairy industry and the detriment of the rest of the world’s dairy exporters.

“Regarding Minister Freeland’s comment that the United States should be grateful that it sells more dairy products to Canada than it imports, this is hardly an example of a ‘good deal’ for farmers in the United States or consumers in Canada,” NMPF says. “Much of what the United States exports to Canada is ultimately shipped back out under Canadian import for re-export programs. Canada has been refusing to share details of imports and exports under those programs, but the reality is that much of the dairy the United States ships to Canada doesn’t stay in Canada.”

NMPF notes the Canadian supply management program was basically ignored in 1993 when NAFTA was first negotiated.

“As the next generation of NAFTA arrives, here’s hoping that Canada is finally ready to have its dairy sector play by the same set of rules everyone else has been operating under for years,” NMPF says.

The current talks are just one of several planned by the U.S., Canadian and Mexican governments. IDFA expects the next talks to occur in September in Mexico, but no dates have officially been announced.

“Negotiators hope to conclude the talks by the end of the year,” says Beth Hughes, IDFA director of international affairs. “This fast-paced goal means IDFA will have several opportunities this fall to provide input in the discussions.”

Once an agreement is reached, the United States will send it to Congress for approval. Mexico will send the agreement to their Senate for a vote. Canada is required to table it in its House of Commons for a minimum of 21 days for discussion, but no vote is required on the agreement. Ratification in Canada will then be handled by its Cabinet.

CMN


Ballard Cheese named Champion
at IMPA contest

August 18, 2017

SUN VALLEY, Idaho — A Farmstead 8-month-old Gouda made by Travis Ballard of Ballard Cheese LLC, Gooding, Idaho, received Grand Champion honors at the 2017 Idaho Milk Processors Association (IMPA) Dairy Product Contest.

Mozzarella Fresca, soft pouch, made by Marion Bidron of Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, was the first runner-up, while an espresso and lavender cheese made by Tim Welsh of Beehive Cheese Co., Uintah, Utah, was second runner-up overall.

Contest judging took place Aug. 8 at the Glanbia Foods facility in Twin Falls, Idaho. Each class champion except manufacturing cheese was auctioned off at the Wine and Cheese Social Aug. 10 during IMPA’s annual conference in Sun Valley, Idaho. This year’s auction raised a total of $27,000 for the IMPA scholarship fund, and the remaining cheese was donated to charity.

The winning cheeses and auction buyers in each class were as follows:

Class 1: Current Cheddar

First: Phil Baringer, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Cheddar, 97.75. Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, Wisconsin, purchased 40 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $1,200.

Second: Team 3, Agropur-Jerome Cheese, Jerome, Idaho, Current Cheddar, 97.15.

Third: Steve Shobe, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Cheddar, 96.60.

Class 2: Medium Cheddar

First: Team 1, Agropur-Jerome Cheese, Jerome, Idaho, Medium Cheddar, 96.25. Advanced Process Technologies, Cokato, Minnesota, purchased 40 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $3,000.

Second: Tim Tomlinson, Darigold Inc., Seattle, Medium Cheddar, 96.15.

Third: Thomas Chocker, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Cheddar, 95.35.

Class 3: Sharp Cheddar

First: Britton Welsh, Beehive Cheese Co., Uintah, Utah, Promontory, 97.45. Chr. Hansen Inc., Milwaukee, purchased 20 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $1,100.

Second: Team 2, Gossner Foods, Logan, Utah, Sharp White Cheddar, 96.40.

Third: Maria Almanza, Glanbia Nutritionals, Blackfoot, Idaho, Colored Cheddar, 95.95.

Class 4: Aged Cheddar — 12 to 24 months

First: Justin Searle, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Aged Cheddar, 12 months, 97.70. Complete Filtration, Marshfield, Wisconsin, purchased 40 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $1,800.

Second: Maryann Swinney, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Aged Cheddar, 12 months, 95.55.

Third: Team 3, Agropur-Jerome Cheese, Jerome, Idaho, Aged Cheddar, 94.80.

Class 5: Aged Cheddar — older than 24 months

First: Team 3, Gossner Foods, Logan, Utah, Aged White Cheddar, 99.20. DSM, Fergus Falls, Minnesota, purchased 3 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $1,900.

Second: Team 2, Gossner Foods, Logan, Utah, Aged White Cheddar, 98.80.

Third: Team 1, Gossner Foods, Logan, Utah, Aged White Cheddar, 98.15.

Class 6: Washed Curd Cheeses

First: Abel Navarreta Castro, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Monterey Jack, 96.90. Evans Grain, Ogden, Utah, purchased 40 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $1,600.

Second: Aaron Ondriezek, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Colby, 96.90.

Third: Josue Medina, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Monterey Jack, 95.35.

Class 7: Hard Italian Cheese

First: David Campbell, Utah State University Dairy Product Lab, Logan, Utah, Parmesan Style Cheese, 98.75. University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, purchased 23 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $1,000.

Second: Donald Greenberg, Nelson-Ricks Creamery Co., Sugar City, Idaho, Asiago Piacevole, 98.25.

Third: Manuel Montes, Nelson-Ricks Creamery Co., Sugar City, Idaho, Asiago Piacevole, 98.15.

Class 8: Soft/Semi-Soft Cheese

First: Marion Bidron, Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, Mozzarella Fresca, soft pouch, 99.80. Chr. Hansen Inc., Milwaukee, purchased 6 ounces of the first runner-up for a total of $1,600.

Second: Marie Solere, Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, Galbani Whole-Milk, Low-Moisture String Cheese, 99.70.

Third: Dustin Becherer, Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, Low-Moisture, Part-Skim Mozzarella String Cheese, 99.15.

Class 9: Spiced Cheese

First: Ben Parlov, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Habanero Jack, 99.60. Chr. Hansen Inc., Milwaukee, purchased 40 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $2,000.

Second: Alex Sagapolutele, Glanbia Nutritionals, Blackfoot, Idaho, Chipotle Cheddar, 99.50.

Third: Vjekoslav Bampa, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Pepper Jack, 99.40.

Class 10: Flavored Cheese

First: Sebastian Robert, Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, Fresh Mozzarella Marinated, 99.70. ProActive Solutions USA, Dodgeville, Wisconsin, purchased 12 ounces of this winning cheese for a total of $600.

Second: Rudy Jozelic, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Green Olive and Pimento, 99.25.

Third: Jeff Stagg, Beehive Cheese Co., Uintah, Utah, Rosemary Promontory rubbed with rosemary, 99.25.

Class 11: Reduced Fat

First: Gabi Chavez, Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, Reduced Fat Mozzarella String Cheese, 99.80. DuPont, Highlands Ranch, Colorado, purchased 12 ounces of this winning cheese for a total of $1,200.

Second: Samir Zahirovic, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Reduced Fat Cheddar, 99.45.

Third: Norman Christensen, Darigold-Boise, Boise, Idaho, 2 Percent Lowfat Cottage Cheese, 99.45.

Class 12: Open Class

First: Carrie Sargent, Gossner Foods, Logan, Utah, Garden Vegetable Cheese Spread, 96.10. Nelson-Ricks Creamery Co., Sugar City, Idaho, purchased 8 ounces of this winning cheese for a total of $1,100.

Second: Aaron Price, Sorrento Lactalis Inc., Nampa, Idaho, Galbani Mascarpone Cup, 95.95.
Third: Marvin Sharp, Litehouse Foods Inc., Sandpoint, Idaho, Blue Veined Cheese, 95.75.

Class 13: Swiss

First: Team 3, Gossner Foods, Logan, Utah, Swiss, 99.80. Kelley Supply, Colby, Wisconsin, purchased 16 pounds of this winning cheese for a total of $2,000.

Second: Team 2, Gossner Foods-Magic Valley, Heyburn, Idaho, Swiss, 99.60.

Third: Gossner Foods-Magic Valley, Heyburn, Idaho, Swiss, 99.55.

Class 14: Farmstead

First: Travis Ballard, Ballard Cheese LLC, Gooding, Idaho, Farmstead 8-month-old Gouda, 89.45. Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, Wisconsin, purchased 20 pounds of the Grand Champion for a total of $3,400.

Class 15: Artisan

First: Tim Welsh, Beehive Cheese Co., Uintah, Utah, Cheese rubbed with espresso and lavender, 96.20. Chr. Hansen Inc., Milwaukee, purchased 20 pounds of the second runner-up for a total of $1,200.

Second: Manuel Montes/Donald Greenberg, Nelson-Ricks Creamery Co., Sugar City, Idaho, Smoked White Goat Cheddar, 93.85.

Third: Travis Ballard, Ballard Cheese LLC, Gooding, Idaho, Garlic Pepper Cheese Curds, 93.50.

Class 16: Cultured/Cottage Cheese

First: Jessie Cabrera, Darigold-Boise, Boise, Idaho, Sour Cream Natural, 99.40. DuPont, Highlands Ranch, Colorado, purchased 3 pounds of this winning sour cream for a total of $1,200.

Second: Raymond Tamayo, Darigold-Boise, Boise, Idaho, 4 Percent Small Curd Cottage Cheese, 99.25.

Class 17: Butter

First: High Desert Milk, Burley, Idaho, 80 Percent Fat Unsalted Sweet Cream Butter, 99.10. Chicago Dairy, Lake Forest, Illinois, purchased 55 pounds of this winning butter for a total of $1,100.

Second: High Desert Milk, Burley, Idaho, Salted 80 Percent Fat Sweet Cream Butter, 99.00.

Class 18: Granular Cheese For Manufacture

First: Codie Twitchell, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Manufactured Cheddar, 99.80.

Second: Erin Rhodes, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Manufactured Cheddar, 99.10.

Third: Teresa Scruggs, Glanbia Nutritionals, Twin Falls, Idaho, Manufactured Cheddar, 99.05.

CMN


Salemville Cheese Cooperative expansion doubles its footprint
Blue, Gorgonzola products now in updated packaging

By Kate Sander

CAMBRIA, Wis. — Salemville Cheese Cooperative recently completed a construction project that added 15,000 square feet to its award-winning Blue cheese creamery. More than doubling its size, the expansion gave the co-op the opportunity to retool and improve its entire production facility.

Nelson Schrock, operations manager, Salemville Cheese Cooperative, says the new production facility has been operational since the beginning of April. In addition to increased capacity, the new facility — now a total of 28,000 square feet — has improved processes and has added an enclosed milk receiving bay.

While the first few weeks of production in the new facility were trial and error, Schrock says he is now thrilled with the quality of cheese coming off the new line.

“It’s met and exceeded our expectations,” Schrock says.

For a creamery that’s SQF Level 2 certified and regularly wins awards for its Blue and Gorgonzola, that’s saying a lot. The co-op’s most recent win was a best of class award for its Salemville Gorgonzola at the U.S. Championship Cheese Contest this past spring, but the co-op’s cheeses have won dozens of awards over its storied history, including best in the Gorgonzola class at the 2012 World Championship Cheese Contest.

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Sheep industry sees growth
opportunity through cheeses

August 11, 2017

By Rena Archwamety

MADISON, Wis. — As interest in artisan cheese continues to grow, cheesemakers are taking the opportunity to diversify their offerings through new varieties, flavors or milk types. This trend has garnered the attention of domestic dairy sheep producers, a small and relatively young industry that also sees new opportunities for increasing demand for new cheeses.

Laurel Kieffer, who milks about 100 sheep on her Dream Valley Farm in Strum, Wisconsin, says there is not much sheep’s milk cheese availability in areas like nearby Eau Claire, Wisconsin, though she sees great opportunity for high-end artisanal cheeses thanks to a large university, several large medical employers and a nationally-known music festival that all provide an ideal marketing base.

“I would like to see us do a better job of really enlightening people and improving availability. I think people are willing to pay for it,” says Kieffer, who also is interim administrator of the Sheep Dairy Association of Wisconsin and president of the Dairy Sheep Association of North America.

The Dairy Sheep Association of Wisconsin formed last August with the help of the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) as a means to support Wisconsin’s dairy sheep industry and promote sheep’s milk products in the state. The new association was a 2017 recipient of a “Buy Local, Buy Wisconsin” grant, and it currently is working on marketing kits for the 2017 holiday season for cheesemakers, grocery stores and specialty shops to help promote sheep’s milk cheeses and products. It also plans to bring in sheep farmers to do demos in grocery stores and boost exposure for the industry.

The United States produces a very small amount of sheep’s milk and sheep’s milk cheeses, but in recent years it has been importing 40-60 percent of the world’s sheep’s milk cheese trade every year, according to David Thomas, professor of sheep management and genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This spring Thomas presented a webinar on sheep’s milk and sheep’s milk cheese opportunities, sponsored by the American Sheep Industry Association’s Let’s Grow Program. (Visit http://www.sheepusa.org/Growourflock_Resources_EducationalWebinars to view the presentation.)

“We’re far and away the greatest market for sheep milk cheese in the world,” he said during his March presentation, where he also noted that the North American dairy sheep industry is fairly new, with the first commercial dairy sheep farms forming in the mid-late 1980s.

While there are no official USDA numbers on dairy sheep operations in the United States, Thomas estimates there may be around 125 U.S. farms currently milking sheep and about 2 million pounds of sheep’s milk cheese produced each year.

“But we are importing 53-73 million pounds — that’s 28-38 times as much sheep’s milk cheese imported than what is produced here,” he says. “This would seem to indicate tremendous opportunity for domestic production.”

However, he notes that opportunity may not be as simple as it seems based on these numbers. One of the real challenges in the U.S. dairy sheep industry is the small number of producers, most of which are spread out with only about one or two in many states with the exception of concentrations in Wisconsin and New England. Also, he explains that there is no program in North America for organized milk recording or genetic improvement for dairy sheep.

“Marketing of sheep’s milk when you’re an isolated sheep producer is difficult,” he says. “One of the things that everyone must do is make sure that they have a stable market for that sheep milk — either process it themselves or find a local processor for sheep milk — before they enter that business.”

Despite the challenges, he points to a number of success stories across the United States, including Brenda Jensen of Hidden Springs Creamery, a successful sheep dairy and award-winning cheesemaker in Westby, Wisconsin; and Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery in New York, one of the largest sheep dairies in the country and one of the first to make sheep’s milk products in the United States.

Old Chatham started in 1993 with 115 dairy sheep, and now its flock in New York’s Finger Lakes region ranges from 1,200 to 1,400. The creamery always has sourced milk from its own flock, only occasionally buying additional frozen sheep’s milk from Wisconsin when demand for its cheese outpaces its milk availability.

Lewis Fox, flock manager at Old Chatham, says while sheep’s milk production is pretty limited compared to what you can get from a goat or cow, it has unique attributes that make it ideal for cheesemaking.

“It’s a really rich milk, high in components, with a nice clean, sweet flavor,” he says. “It’s also hypoallergenic, easily digestible for people who are lactose intolerant, because it has very small lactose molecules.”

As in other years, Old Chatham’s sheep’s milk cheeses and other dairy products performed well at the recent American Cheese Society (ACS) Judging & Competition. Its line of sheep’s milk yogurts swept the Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added category. The company also won third-place awards for its Ewe’s Blue and mini Kinderhook Creek 100-percent sheep’s milk cheeses and a second-place award for its Kinderhook Creek, as well as second- and third-place awards for a number of its mixed-milk cheeses. Additionally, Hudson Flower — a sheep’s milk cheese Old Chatham makes for Murray’s Cheese, which then coats it with herbs and ages it — won first in its category.

Old Chatham also has been working on several new varieties in response to the growing interest it sees in sheep’s milk cheeses.

“We’ve been in business for over 20 years and we haven’t been as aggressive in research and development as we have in the last couple of years,” says Allyson Brennan, national sales and marketing manager, Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery. “We’re working on Cheddars, Goudas and different styles of bloomy rinds. ... In the next couple years here we’re hoping to really increase the variety of our offerings and categories to be a little more diverse.”

Tony Hook, owner of Hook’s Cheese, Mineral Point, Wisconsin, also has seen success and growing interest in his sheep’s milk and mixed milk varieties. At the ACS competition, Hook’s won second for its Sheep’s Milk Butterkase and Little Boy Blue, and third for its mixed-milk EWE CALF to be KIDding Blue.

Hook’s Cheese — which currently makes about eight sheep’s milk cheeses in addition to three mixed-milk varieties with sheep’s milk — first added sheep’s milk varieties to its line-up in 2009 when Brenda Jensen from Hidden Springs Creamery asked if Hook’s could make a Blue cheese with her sheep’s milk. The collaboration resulted in Hook’s Little Boy Blue and Hidden Springs’ Bohemian Blue. Later, when Hidden Springs started producing more sheep’s milk, Hook’s purchased more from the company and started making new sheep’s milk varieties. Currently Hook’s receives 4,000-5,000 pounds of sheep’s milk a week from Hidden Springs for their cheeses.

While sheep’s milk cheeses still comprise a small percentage of his company’s overall production, Hook says the market for these cheeses has been growing across the United States, especially among chefs and specialty cheese shops.

“We’ve had to ask for more milk because sales are growing every year,” Hook says, adding that the mixed milk cheeses especially are catching on. “Our sheep’s milk Blue has been very well received. The Sheep Milk Butterkase just won another award, and sheep’s milk Cheddar has done well.”

Kieffer says following the ACS awards, there typically is more demand for the award-winning cheeses and sheep’s milk. However, this also corresponds with the end of the sheep milking season.

“Last month, the weather was really hot, and production had taken a dive. We had calls from two cheesemakers who were really suffering and needed milk,” she says. “Cheesemakers can’t keep their shelf space filled. We have a lot of work to do.”

CMN


Wisconsin State Fair cheese
auction raises record $56,760

August 11, 2017

WEST ALLIS, Wis. — Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, Wisconsin, was named the 2017 Grand Master Cheese Maker during the Blue Ribbon Cheese & Butter Auction Thursday at Wisconsin State Fair Park. Plant Manager Gary Gosda accepted the award on behalf of Team Lake Country Dairy for Monteau, the first-place entry in the Smear Ripened Cheese class at the 2017 Wisconsin State Fair Cheese & Butter Contest.

Each blue ribbon entry from the contest sold during the event, which raised a record total of $56,760 for student scholarships and dairy promotions at the Wisconsin State Fair.

Chr. Hansen purchased 22 pounds of Monteau for $50 per pound for a total of $1,100.

Other auction results include:

Mild Cheddar: Dan Stearns, Agropur, Weyauwega, made the 42 pounds of Mild Cheddar purchased by Masters Gallery Foods for $60 per pound for a total of $2,520.

Swiss Styles: Marc Druart, Emmi Roth, Monroe, made the 20 pounds of Roth Petite Swiss purchased by Wells Fargo for $60 per pound for a total of $1,200.

Flavored Soft Cheese: Steve Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, made the 10 pounds of Odyssey Peppercorn Feta purchased by Emmi Roth for $100 per pound for a total of $1,000.

Flavored Goat Milk Cheese: Team Lancaster, Saputo Specialty Cheese, Milwaukee, made the 10 pounds of Wild Blueberry Vanilla Chèvre purchased by Rock River Laboratories for $80 per pound for a total of $800.

Smoked Cheese: Saxon Creamery Team, Saxon Cheese, Cleveland, made the 12 pounds of Big Ed’s Smokehouse Gouda purchased by Saputo for $215 per pound for a total of $2,580.

Flavored Hard Cheese: Mike Matucheski, Sartori Co., Antigo, made the 20 pounds of Sartori Reserve Chipotle BellaVitano purchased by Berenz Packaging for $70 per pound for a total of $1,400.

Pasteurized Process Cheese, Cheese Food, Spread: AMPI Slice Team, Associated Milk Producers Inc., Portage, made the 10 pounds of Pasteurized Process American purchased by Nelson-Jameson for $110 per pound for a total of $1,100.

Open Class for Hard Cheese: Chris Roelli, Roelli Cheese Co., Shullsburg, made the 11 pounds of Dunbarton purchased by John Yingling for $150 per pound for a total of $1,650.

Flavored Havarti: Ron Bechtolt, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, made the 10 pounds of Dill Havarti purchased by Nelson-Jameson for $120 per pound for a total of $1,200.

String Cheese: Dan Schwind, Baker Cheese Factory, St. Cloud, made the 10 pounds of String cheese purchased by Masters Gallery Foods for $230 per pound for a total of $2,300.

Flavored Semi-Soft Cheese: John (Randy) Pitman, Mill Creek Cheese, Arena, made the 10 pounds of Caraway Brick purchased by Cheese Market News for $75 per pound for a total of $750.

Blue Veined Cheese: Team Fond du Lac, Saputo Specialty Cheese, Milwaukee, made the 12 pounds of Black River Blue Cheese purchased by Alpma USA for $80 per pound for a total of $960.

Reduced Fat or Lite Cheese: Steve Webster, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, made the 10 pounds of Odyssey Reduced Fat Feta purchased by Chr. Hansen for $50 per pound for a total of $500.

Brick, Muenster: Matt Henze, Decatur Dairy, Brodhead, made the 10 pounds of Brick purchased by Kelley Supply for $120 per pound for a total of $1,200.

Open Class for Soft & Spreadable Cheese: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, Waterloo, made the 10 pounds of Mascarpone purchased by Wells Fargo for $140 per pound for a total of $1,400.

Colby, Monterey Jack: Andy Follen, Lynn Dairy, Granton, made the 40 pounds of Monterey Jack purchased by DSM for $30 per pound for a total of $1,200.

Natural Goat Milk Cheese: Katie Fuhrmann & Team LaClare, LaClare Farms, Malone, made the 10 pounds of Aged Goat Cheese purchased by Dairy Products Marketing for $290 per pound for a total of $2,900.

Mozzarella: Roger Krohn, Agropur, Luxemburg, made the 13 pounds of Low-Moisture, Whole-Milk Mozzarella purchased by Ebert Enterprises for $100 per pound for a total of $1,300.

Latin American Cheese: Jace Johnsrud, Chula Vista Cheese, Browntown, made the 10 pounds of Chihuahua Loaf purchased by Masters Gallery Foods for $220 per pound for a total of $2,200.

Open Class For Semi-Soft Cheese: Marieke Penterman, Marieke Gouda, Thorp, made the 20 pounds of Marieke Belegen Gouda purchased by Ivarson Inc. for $130 per pound for a total of $2,600.

Aged Cheddar: Jacque Vey, Land O’Lakes, Kiel, made the 40 pounds of Aged Cheddar purchased by Masters Gallery Foods for $165 per pound for a total of $6,600.

Cold Pack Cheese, Cheese Food: Team Pine River, Pine River Pre-Pack, Newton, made the 11 pounds of Swiss & Almond Cold Pack purchased by Saputo for $210 per pound for a total of $2,310.

Feta: Nathan Forseth, Agropur, Weyauwega, made the 18 pounds of Feta purchased by DSM for $105 per pound for a total of $1,890.

Flavored Pepper Cheese: Marc Druart, Emmi Roth, Monroe, made the 10 pounds of Roth Sriracha Gouda purchased by State Fair Park Board for $350 per pound for a total of $3,500.

Sheep & Mixed Milk Cheese: Mike Matucheski, Sartori Co., Antigo, made the 20 pounds of Sartori Limited Edition Pastorale Blend purchased by West Allis Cheese Shoppe for $260 per pound for a total of $5,200.

Havarti: Decatur Dairy Cheesemakers, Decatur Dairy, Brodhead, made the 10 pounds of Havarti purchased by Nelson-Jameson for $320 per pound for a total of $3,200.

Butter: Foremost Farms 3rd Shift, Foremost Farms USA, Reedsburg, made the 10 pounds of Salted Butter purchased by Ivarson Inc. for $220 per pound for a total of $2,200.

CMN


Milk production forecasts
lowered for 2017, 2018

August 11, 2017

WASHINGTON — With slow growth in milk per cow that more than offsets increases in dairy cow numbers, USDA lowered its U.S. milk production forecasts for 2017 and 2018 in its “World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates” report released Thursday.

For 2017, USDA projects milk production will total 215.7 billion pounds, down 600 million pounds from its forecast a month ago. The 2018 milk production projection has been lowered to 220.3 billion pounds, down 900 million pounds from last month’s report.

For 2017, fat-basis exports are raised from the previous month on higher butter and anhydrous milkfat shipments. Fat-basis imports are unchanged. The skim-solid basis export forecast for 2017 is lowered on weaker than expected whey sales. The import forecast is unchanged.

For 2018, fat-basis exports are raised on stronger shipments of a number of dairy products, USDA says. Fat-basis imports are lowered slightly. Skim-solid basis exports are raised on expected stronger sales of nonfat dry milk (NDM) and other dairy products while imports are unchanged from last month.

Cheese and butter price forecasts are raised for 2017 and 2018 as demand strength is expected to carry into 2018. Cheese is forecast to average in the $1.590-$1.610 per pound range in 2017, up from $1.575-$1.605 in last month’s report. In 2018 cheese is expected to average in the $1.640-$1.740 range, up from $1.630-$1.730 last month. In 2017, butter now is forecast to average $2.425-$2.465, up from $2.365-$2.425 last month, and in 2018 butter is expected to average $2.2375-$2.505, up from $2.310-$2.440 in last month’s report.

The NDM and whey price forecasts are reduced from the previous month on weak demand, USDA says. NDM is forecast to average $0.885-$0.905 in 2017, down from $0.900-$0.930 in last month’s report. In 2018, USDA forecasts NDM will average $0.905-$0.975, down from its forecast of $0.935-$1.005 a month ago. Dry whey is forecast to average $0.455-$0.475 in 2017, down 2 cents from last month’s report. In 2018, USDA forecasts dry whey will average $0.445-$0.475, down from its $0.480-$0.510 forecast a month ago.

The 2017 Class III price forecast, at $15.90-$16.10 per hundredweight, is unchanged at the mid-point, but the 2018 price is lowered to $16.30-$17.30 as lower whey prices more than offset higher cheese prices, USDA says.

The Class IV price forecast for 2017 is raised as stronger forecast butter prices more than offset lower NDM prices. The 2017 Class IV price is forecast at $15.75-$16.05, up from $15.65-$16.05. The 2018 Class IV price forecast is unchanged at $15.70-$16.80. The all-milk price is raised to $17.80-$18.80 for 2017, up from $17.65-$17.95 in last month’s report, but is unchanged at $18.00-$19.00 for 2018.

CMN


Canada has new TRQs,
processor support with CETA

August 11, 2017

OTTAWA, Ontario — Canadian Minister of International Trade Francois-Philippe Chamagne recently announced the allocation of new tariff rate quotas (TRQs) for imports of cheese from the European Union (EU) under the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), which is set to take effect Sept. 21. The government says Canadian companies that previously did not have permits to import cheese now will be able to apply for a share of the new CETA import quotas. This is the first time since the 1970s that new cheese quotas are being allocated in Canada.

CETA will allow a total of 17,700 metric tons of cheese to enter Canada from EU member countries. This number includes 800 metric tons Canada reallocated from its World Trade Organization TRQs for cheese. The Canadian government will gradually increase TRQ levels to meet this total over a period of five years. To start, it set a TRQ for the remainder of 2017 of more than 824 metric tons for both cheese sold for retail and for further food manufacturing, and the TRQ at 5,900 metric tons for 2018.

The new quotas will provide additional opportunities for Canadian businesses in the cheese sector, particularly small- and medium-sized enterprises, which will be allocated 60 percent of the quotas. Small- and medium-sized cheese manufacturers will receive 30 percent of the quota, and small- and medium-sized distributors and retailers will receive the other 30 percent. Meanwhile, large manufacturers will be allocated 20 percent of the quotas and large distributors and retailers will receive the other 20 percent.

The government says Canadian consumers also will benefit as new varieties of European cheese will be made available for consumption in Canada. Canadian companies of all sizes will benefit from new opportunities to import EU cheese and grow their businesses, the government adds.

“We are on track for the provisional application of CETA on Sept. 21. I am confident that we have set the stage for exciting opportunities for Canadians in the cheese sector, particularly for our small- and medium-sized enterprises,” Champagne says. “We held extensive consultations with a wide range of stakeholders about the best way to allocate the EU cheese quotas under CETA. These allocations will ensure benefits are achieved throughout the value chain.”

Under CETA, Canada established new TRQs for cheese originating in the EU: one for cheeses of all types and one for use in further food processing (industrial cheese). Each of the two CETA quotas will be phased in over five years. The quota for all types of cheese will be allocated to eligible Canadian enterprises that are active in the manufacturing, distribution or retailing of cheese. The quota for industrial cheese will be allocated entirely to processors for use in other foods.

The Canadian government also has established the Dairy Processing Investment Fund to provide funding to dairy processors for investments that will improve productivity and competitiveness and help prepare them for the implementation of CETA. Cheesemakers and other dairy processors are eligible to receive up to C$10 million to support investments in equipment and infrastructure, and processors and not-for-profit organizations in the dairy sector can receive up to C$250,000 to access technical, managerial and business expertise.

The fund also will allow applicants to request access to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada scientists to conduct collaborative research on projects related to improving an existing product, practice, process or technology.

The overall program budget is C$100 million, and the program will end March 31, 2021.

CMN


CME cheese prices surge as
U.S., global demand heats up

August 4, 2017

By Alyssa Mitchell

MADISON, Wis. — Dairy spot market activity at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) was anything but dull this week. Cheddar barrels surged to a two-month high of $1.555 per pound last Friday and increased another 11.5 cents Tuesday to $1.66. Following the move up, barrel prices then backed off to settle at $1.53 today.

Cheddar blocks also have surged in the past month, moving from the low-$1.50s at the beginning of July to the $1.70s in the past couple of weeks. Blocks settled at $1.6975 today.

Analysts note a long-term fairly large price spread between blocks and barrels is beginning to close.
“I think we’re working ourselves in a direction to get the spread in line, and as milk production ebbs seasonally, we’ll see that spread tighten,” says Eric Meyer, president of HighGround Dairy, Chicago.

USDA’s Dairy Market News says cheese producers in the Midwest are reporting that milk supplies are still available, but noticeably lower than this time last month. Foodservice orders are growing for specialty/traditional cheesemakers.

“Pizza cheese producers report sales are meeting seasonal expectations,” Dairy Market News says. “Curd producers are still experiencing a seasonal push as state fairs are beginning this week in Midwestern states.”

Sara Dorland, managing partner at Ceres Dairy Risk Management, Seattle, says stronger U.S. cheese exports also could be helping to rebalance the domestic supply/demand situation. In addition, last month’s “Cold Storage” report from USDA had a July stocks revision that helped to improve cheese commercial disappearance figures.

“It’s summer and grilling season. School is about to head back into session, so milk to manufacturing should slow, and with college back in session, pizza sales should seasonally increase,” Dorland says.

Dave Kurzawski, senior broker with INTL FCStone, Chicago, says one of the key stories for cheese demand in 2017 is the “war” going on at the retail level, with the dairy case on the front lines.

“Competition has been going from tough to intensely fierce as traditional grocers battle with online and new discount competitors,” he says, noting the pressure is forcing existing companies to reevaluate their pricing in dairy, causing price pressure in many categories.

Kurzawski also notes the line of sellers at the CME has dwindled in recent weeks, while the line of buyers has improved.

“There is solid demand for processed solids both domestically and abroad, and the environment has improved for exports with the U.S. dollar continuing to lose ground against other major dairy exporters,” he says.

CME butter, while still at a high price, is experiencing more volatility in recent weeks, swinging from $2.58 per pound to as high as $2.7375 on Thursday. Butter settled at $2.73 today.

Andrew Faulman, floor manager at Rice Dairy LLC, Chicago, says butter’s $2.70 price level seems to have generated trade in the futures and options space as well as the spot market.

“Futures are pointing to us maintaining spot north of $2.70,” he says. “When you head east across the pond, we’re seeing prices in the low $3 realm. The demand for fat around the world has grown, particularly in the EU. I believe this is lending support to our market even at the $2.70 price level.”

Dairy Market News says some market participants consider the possibility of a $3 CME butter cash price by the early fall.

Meanwhile, excessive inventories have been keeping a lid on the spot nonfat dry milk (NDM) price for the better part of the year, Faulman says.

“While we have seen exports pick up to places like Mexico and China, it has only been enough to keep prices supported in the mid-$0.80s,” he says.

However, Faulman adds he believes there will be a number of contributing factors that will pull that market back above $1 per pound.

“Exports do not appear to be slowing down,” he says, noting increased export demand and decreased milk supply in butter and powder-producing areas will be the drivers to $1-plus NDM.

Dorland says that price level would require less supply or more demand for dairy proteins.

“Given the butterfat situation in Europe, it will take more milk and more skim milk powder to correct the situation,” she says. “The market is still heavy on milk powder, and the stockpiles sitting in intervention could work to put a ceiling on a price run. There are pockets of demand for milk powders that could absorb quite a bit of product, but they are highly price-sensitive.”

Meyer says he sees the possibility of a seasonal rally for NDM over the next 60 days, but he doesn’t see a lot of upside beyond the mid- to high-$0.90s.

Dairy Market News says Central U.S. contacts suggest buyers are exercising patience and working through on-hand supplies before entering into the spot market, while in the East, the market undertone is fair with views of softness as prices are staying around the low $0.90s, and supplies are plentiful.

CMN


Tarentaise Reserve wins its
second title at ACS contest

August 4, 2017

DENVER — Tarentaise Reserve, made by the Spring Brook Farm Team at Farms for City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Reading, Vermont, was named Best of Show in this year’s American Cheese Society (ACS) Judging and Competition. This was the second time Tarentaise Reserve won the ACS Best of Show Award. The cheese also received the top ACS award during its 2014 competition.

“We’re delighted — it’s a great honor,” says Jeremy Stephenson, cheese program director, Spring Brook Farm. “I’m very happy for my team, which starts with the dairy farmers and goes right through to the folks in packing and shipping, retailers and distributors.”

Stephenson adds that it’s important to mention that this Alpine-style cheese, made from Jersey cow’s milk and aged for two years or more, is made as part of the nonprofit Farms for City Kids Foundation that gives students a chance to experience a dairy farm and the cheesemaking process up close.

“We suit them up and then come into the aging room and experience how that smells like,” he explains. “We let them, if we have time, pick up the wheels, turn them and wash one or two wheels. Beforehand we do some tabletop work to see how milk coagulates when you add enzymes and rennet to get a sense of what actually happens at the vat.”

Second place overall at the ACS contest went to St. Malachi made by Matt Hettlinger and Samuel Kennedy of The Farm at Doe Run, Coatesville, Pennsylvania. In third place overall was Harbison made by Mateo Kehler, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Greensboro Bend, Vermont.

Judging took place during last week’s ACS annual conference in Denver. This year’s competition was the largest ever, with 2,024 entries from 281 companies across the United States as well as from Canada, Mexico and Colombia.

“Artisan cheese is clearly on a growth curve in both quality and diversity. We are thrilled by the record number of entries in this year’s ACS competition. It is a testament to the creativity and vitality of artisan cheesemakers,” says Nora Weiser, executive director, ACS.

The award-winning cheeses in each category follow; some classes do not have first-place awards, and some include ties.

A. FRESH UNRIPENED CHEESES

AC: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Samish Bay Cheese, Washington, Vache.

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Cottage Cheese.

Third: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Crescenza-Straccino.

AG: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark and Ricotta — made from goat’s milk

First: Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Spreadable Idyll Pastures.

Second: Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Ricotta.

Third: Briar Rose Creamery, Oregon, Fromage Frais.

AH: Cheese Curds — all milks

First: Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Cheese Curd.

Second: Springside Cheese Corp., Wisconsin, White Cheddar Curds.

Third: Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Cheddar Cheese Curds.

AM: Mascarpone and Cream Cheese — made from cow’s milk

First: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Crema di Mascarpone.

Second: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Mascarpone.

Third: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Mascarpone.

AQ: Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais and Quark — made from cow’s milk

First: Hemme Brother Creamery, Missouri, Quark.

Second: Udderly Cool Dairy LLC, Georgia, Fromage Blanc.

Third: Milton Creamery LLC, Iowa, Quark.

AR: Ricotta — made from cow’s milk

First: Luizzi Cheese, Massachusetts, Hand Dipped Ricotta.

Second: Maplebrook Farm, Vermont, Ricotta Alta.

Third: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Hand Dipped Ricotta.

AS: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark and Ricotta — made from sheep’s milk

First: Fruition Farms Creamery, Colorado, Sheep’s Milk Ricotta.

Second: Buf Creamery LLC, Colombia, Buf Ricotta.

AX: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark and Ricotta — made from mixed or other milks

First: Morsey’s Farms, California, LF Ricotta.

Second: Calabro Cheese Crop., Connecticut, Ricotta di Bufala.

Third: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Ricotta.

B. SOFT-RIPENED CHEESES

BA: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Harbison.

Second: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Moses Sleeper.

Second: Zingerman’s Creamery, Michigan, Manchester.

Third: von Trapp Farmstead, Vermont, Mt. Alice.

BB: Brie — made from cow’s milk

First: Brush Creek Creamery, Idaho, Mountain Maple Brie.

Second: Calkins Creamery, Pennsylvania, Noble Road.

Third: Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, 16-ounce Aromatic Brie.

BC: Camembert — made from cow’s milk

First: Mt. Townsend Creamery, Washington, Cirrus.

Second: Sweet Grass Dairy, Georgia, Green Hill.

Third: Blythedale Farm Inc., Vermont, Camembert Vermont.

BG: Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Gris 1-pound.

Second: Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Mont Idyll 4-ounce.

Third: Cypress Grove, California, Bermuda Triangle.

Third: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Bonne Bouche.

BS: Open Category — made from sheep’s milk

First: Fromagerie Nouvelle France, Québec, Madelaine.

Second: Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Magnolia.

Second: Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Hawkins Haze.

Third: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Mini Kinderhook Creek.

BT: Triple Crème — soft ripened/cream added — all milks

First: Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, 8-ounce Triple Creme Brie.

Second: Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, 3-kilogram Triple Creme Brie.

Second: Nettle Meadow, New York, Kunik.

Third: Tulip Tree Creamery, Indiana, Trillium.

BX: Open Category — made from mixed or other milks

First: Baetje Farms LLC, Missouri, Miette.

Second: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Wee Woolly.

Second: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Hudson Valley Camembert Square.

Third: Atalanta Corp./Quality Cheese Inc., Ontario, Albert’s Leap Buffalo Brie.

C. AMERICAN ORIGINALS

CB: Brick Cheese — made from cow’s milk

First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Washed Rind Brick Cheese.

Second: Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Brick.

Second: Zimmerman Cheese, Wisconsin, Traditional Style Brick.

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Mild Brick Cheese.

CC: Original Recipe/Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Central Coast Creamery, California, Bishops Peak.

First: Emmi Roth USA, Wisconsin, Roth’s Private Reserve.

Second: Moonside Creamery, California, Lunetta.

Third: Roelli Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Dunbarton.

CD: Dry Jack — made from cow’s milk

Second: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Dry Monterey Jack.

Third: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Peppercorn Dry Jack.

CG: Original Recipe/Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Harbor Home Farm, Washington, Vashon Banon.

Second: Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Providence.

Third: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Coupole.

CJ: Monterey Jack — made from cow’s milk

First: Mt. Townsend Creamery, Washington, New Moon.

Second: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Monterey Jack Wheel.

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Monterey Jack.

CM: Brick, Muenster — made from cow’s milk

First: Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Tuscan Dream.

Second: Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Comstock Division, Wisconsin, Red Rind Muenster.

Third: Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Muenster.

Third: Fair Oaks Farms, Wisconsin, Muenster.

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Muenster.

CS: Original Recipe/Open Category — made from sheep’s milk

First: Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Ovella.

Second: Bleating Heart Cheese, California, Fat Bottom Girl.

Second: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Bossa.

Third: Central Coast Creamery, California, Ewereka.

CT: Teleme — made from cow’s milk

First: Peluso Cheese, California, Peluso Teleme.

CX: Original Recipe/Open Category — made from mixed or other milks

First: Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Montague.

Second: Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyllweiss 8-ounce.

Third: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagsheep.

Third: LaClare Farms Specialties LLC, Wisconsin, LaClare Farms Cave Aged Chandoka.

CY: Colby — made from cow’s milk

First: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Robin.

Second: Neighborly Farms of Vermont, Vermont, Organic Colby.

Third: Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Colby Deli Longhorn.

Third: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Alto Colby.

Third: Springside Cheese Corp., Wisconsin, Colby.

D. AMERICAN MADE/INTERNATIONAL STYLE

DC: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Farms for City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Tarentaise Reserve.

Second: Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont, Rupert Reserve.

Third: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Monte.

DD: Dutch-Style (Gouda, Edam etc.) — all milks

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Aged Brined Twin Grove Gouda.

Second: Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Lindale.

Second: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Gouda ­— 2 Year.

Third: Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Aged (9-12 month).

DE: Emmental-style with Eye Formation (Swiss, Baby Swiss, Blocks, Wheels) — made from cow’s milk

First: Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Emmental.

Second: Swiss Valley Farms, Iowa, Swiss Block.

Third: Central Coast Creamery, California, Holey Cow.

Third: Fair Oaks Farms, Wisconsin, Sweet Swiss.

DG: Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Laura Chenel’s Chevre, California, Goat Brie.

Second: Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Goat’s Beard.

Third: Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Mont Idyll 8-ounce.

DS: Open Category — made from sheep’s milk

First: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Pecora Nocciola.

Second: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Sheep Milk Butterkase.

Third: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Prairie Tomme.

DX: Open Category — made from mixed or other milks

First: Crown Finish Caves, Vermont, Goatlet.

Second: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Aux Arcs.

Third: Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Limited Edition Pastorale Blend.

E. CHEDDARS

EA: Aged Cheddar — aged over 12 and up to 24 months — all milks

First: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Stag.

Second: Vermont Farmstead Cheese Co., Vermont, Governors Cheddar.

Third: Milton Creamery LLC, Iowa, Prairie Breeze.

EB: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen — aged over 12 months — all milks

First: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagship Reserve.

Second: Cow’s Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar — Aged Over 12 Months.

Third: Bleu Mont Dairy, Wisconsin, “Reserve” Bandaged Cheddar.

Third: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Cabot Clothbound Cheddar Select.

EC: Cheddar — aged up to 12 months — made from cow’s milk

First: Cows Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Extra Old Cheddar.

Second: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, English Hollow Cheddar.

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Lamberton.

EE: Mature Cheddar — aged over 48 months — all milks

First: Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Vintage White Extra Sharp 4 Year Reserve Cheddar.

Second: Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Balderson Heritage Cheddar — 5 year Cheddar.

Second: Springside Cheese Corp., Wisconsin, 4 Year Aged Cheddar.

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Old School Cheddar.

Third: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek 7 Year Proprietor’s Grand Reserve Specialty Cheddar.

EG: Cheddar — aged up to 12 months — made from goat’s sheep’s, buffalo’s, mixed or other milk

First: Central Coast Creamery, California, Goat Cheddar.

Second: Creamery 333, Wisconsin, Trivium.

Third: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capra Bianca Aged Goat Cheddar.

EW: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen — aged up to 12 months — all milks

First: Avalanche Cheese Co., Colorado, Avalanche Cheese Co. Hand Bandaged Goat Cheddar.

Second: Crown Finish Caves, Vermont, Bandaged Bismark.

Third: Bleu Mont Dairy, Wisconsin, Bandaged Cheddar.

EX: Mature Cheddar — aged over 24 and up to 48 months — all milks

First: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Imperial Buck.

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Vintage Choice Cheddar.

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, Two Year White Cheddar.

Third: Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Balderson Royal Canadian — 2 year.

F. BLUE MOLD CHEESES

FC: Rindless Blue-veined — made from cow’s milk

First: Simply Artisan Reserve by Litehouse, Idaho, Simply Artisan Reserve True Gorgonzola.

Second: Simply Artisan Reserve by Litehouse, Idaho, Simply Artisan Reserve Gorgonzola.

Third: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Blue.

FE: External Blue-molded cheeses — all milks

First: Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Classic Blue Log.

Second: Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Bluebonnet.

Third: Prodigal Farm, North Carolina, Bearded Lady.

FG: Rindless Blue-veined — made from goat’s milk

Second: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Barneveld Blue.

Second: Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Chèvre in Blue.

Third: Firefly Farms, Maryland, Black & Blue.

FK: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating — made from cow’s milk

First: Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Organic Caveman Blue Cheese.

Second: Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Organic Tolman Blue Cheese.

Third: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Bay Blue.

FL: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating — made from goat’s milk

First: Lively Run Dairy, New York, Cayuga Blue.

Second: Avalanche Cheese Co., Colorado, Avalanche Cheese Co. Midnight Blue.

Third: FireFly Farms, Maryland, Mountain Top Bleu.

FM: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating — made from sheep’s milk

Third: La Moutonniere Inc., Québec, Bleu De La Moutonniere.

FS: Rindless Blue-veined — made from sheep’s milk

First: Shepherd’s Way Farms, Minnesota, Big Woods Blue.

Second: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Little Boy Blue.

Third: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Ewe’s Blue.

FX: Rindless Blue-veined — made from mixed or other milks

First: Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Echo Mountain Blue Cheese.

Second: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Trinity Blue.

Third: Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, EWE CALF to be KIDding Blue.

FZ: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating — made from mixed or other milks

Third: Pennyroyal Farm, California, Boonter’s Blue.

G. HISPANIC & PORTUGUESE STYLE CHEESES

GA: Ripened, aged over 90 days — all milks

First: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Gold Hill.

Second: The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, The Creamery Collection Batch #15.

Third: Emmi Roth USA, Wisconsin, GranQueso.

Third: The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, The Creamery Collection Batch #11.

GC: Fresh, Unripened — all milks

First: CannonBelles Cheese, Minnesota, Queso Fresco.

Second: Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Panela.

Second: University of Connecticut Department of Animal Science, Connecticut, Queso Blanco.

Third: Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Fresco.

Third: Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., California, Panela.

GM: Cooking Hispanic — Cheeses intended to be consumed heated or melted — all milks

First: Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Oaxaca.

Second: V&V Supremo Foods, Wisconsin, Queso Chihuahua.

Third: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Oaxaca.

Third: V&V Supremo Foods, Wisconsin, Queso Del Caribe.

H. ITALIAN TYPE CHEESES

HA: Grating types (Aged Asiago, Domestic Parmesan, Grana, Reggianito, Sardo; Romano made only from cow’s or goat’s milk) — all milks

First: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Organic Copper Kettle Parmesan.

Second: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Parmesan.

Third: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Artisan Parmesan Cheese.

HB: Burrata — Fresh Mozzarella encasing a distinctly separate, softer curd and cream or other soft cheese core — all milks

First: Liuzzi Cheese, Massachusetts, Burrata.

Second: Maplebrook Farm, Vermont, Burrata.

Third: Buf Creamery LLC, Colombia, Buf Burrata.

Third: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Burrata.

Third: Toscana Cheese Co., New Jersey, Burrata.

HD: Traditional Regional Italian Cheeses — all milks

First: Caputo Brothers Creamery, Pennsylvania, Ricotta Salata Vecchio.

Second: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Fontal.

Third: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Aged Fontina.

Third: Parish Hill Creamery, Vermont, Reverie.

Third: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Asiago.

Third: Southwest Cheese LLC, New Mexico, Fresh Asiago.

HM: Mozzarella types (Brick, Scamorza, String cheese) — all milks

First: Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P., Québec, Chef Collection Mozzarellissima.

Second: Ferndale Farmstead Cheese, Washington, Scamorza.

Third: Lactalis American Group, Idaho, Whole-Milk Low-Moisture Mozzarella Cheese.

Third: Lactalis American Group, Idaho, Organic Low-Moisture Part-Skim String Cheese.

HP: Pasta Filata types (Provolone, Caciocavallo) — all milks

First: Lactalis American Group, Idaho, Provolone String Cheese.

Second: Lactalis American Group, Idaho, Mild Provolone.

Third: Loveras Market, Oklahoma, Caciocavera.

HY: Fresh Mozzarella — 8-ounce or More (Balls or Shapes) — all milks

First: Liuzzi Cheese, Massachusetts, Filoncino.

Second: Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Fresh Mozzarella.

Third: Maplebrook Farm, Vermont, Handmade Mozzarella.

HZ: Fresh Mozzarella — Under 8-ounce (Ovalini, Bocconcini, Ciliegine sizes — all milks

First: Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Fresh Mozzarella-under 8 ounces.

Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Ovoline.

Third: Luizzi Cheese, Massachusetts, Ovoline.

I. FETA CHEESES

IC: Feta — made from cow’s milk

First: Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Black Diamond Feta.

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Feta.

Third: Brazos Valley Cheese, Texas, Feta.

IG: Feta — made from goat’s milk

First: Briar Rose Creamery, Oregon, Goat Milk Feta.

Second: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Bella Capra Goat Feta.

Third: Pure Luck Farm and Dairy, Texas, Feta.

IS: Feta ­— made from sheep’s milk

First: Tucker Family Farm, Montana, Feta.

Second: Fruition Farms Creamery, Colorado, Sheep’s Milk Feta.

Third: Shepherds Manor Creamery, Maryland, Shepherds Manor Fetina.

IX: Feta — made from mixed or other milks

Second: Doe’s and Diva’s Dairy Inc., Iowa, Feta.

J. LOWFAT/LOW SALT CHEESES

JL: Fat Free and Lowfat cheeses — all milks

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Low-Fat Cheddar.

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Low Fat Feta.

Third: Fromagerie Le Détour, Québec, La Dame du Lac.

Third: La Fromagerie Alexis de Portneuf, Québec, Brise du matin light.

JR: Light/Lite and Reduced Fat cheeses — all milks

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Reduced Fat Cured Gouda.

Second: Fromagerie L’Ancêtre Inc., Québec, L’Ancêtre Organic Light Medium Cheddar.

Third: Swiss Valley Farms, Iowa, Neufchatel 3-pound Loaf.

K. FLAVORED CHEESES

KA: Fresh Unripened Cheese with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Couet Farm & Fromagerie LLC, Massachusetts, Fran de Maquis.

Second: Clock Shadow Creamery, Wisconsin, Quark with SA Braai Chutney.

Third: Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Apricot Honey Fromage Blanc.

KB: Soft-Ripened with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Michigan, 3-kilogram Brie with Herbs.

Second: Cowgirl Creamery, California, Pierce Point.

Second: Lactalis American Group, New York, President Brie Garlic and Herbs Torte.

Third: Marin French Cheese Co., California, Petite Jalapeno.

Third: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Michigan, 3-kilogram Brie with Black and Green Peppercorns.

KC: Open Category — Cheeses with Flavor Added — all milks and mixed milks

First: Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Pimento Colby.

Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Rotolini Gold (Prosciutto).

Third: Bellwether Farms, California, Blackstone.

KD: International-Style with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, California, Cumin Gouda.

Second: Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Pepper Muenster.

Third: Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Onion Garlic.

KE: Cheddar with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Great Midwest Salsa Fresca Cheddar.

Second: Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Marco Polo Reserve.

Second: Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Peppercorn Harvest Reserve Clothbound Cheddar.

Third: High Country Creamery, Maryland, The Rev.

KF: Farmstead Cheese with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Claire’s Mandell Hill.

Second: Ludwig Farmstead Creamery, Illinois, Jake’s Wheel Special Herb.

Third: Fairy Tale Farm, Vermont, Barbegazi.

KG: Hispanic-Style with Flavor Added — all milks

First: V&V Supremo Foods, Wisconsin, Queso Chihuahua with Jalapeno Peppers.

Second: Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Botanero Cilantro y Jalapeno.

Third: Mozzarella Co., Texas, Menonina Pimiento.

Third: University of Connecticut Department of Animal Science Creamery, Connecticut, Green Chile Queso Blanco.

KI: Feta with Flavor Added ­— all milks

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Peppercorn Feta.

Second: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Nikos Tomato Basil Feta Cheese.

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Tomato & Basil Feta.

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Mediterranean Feta.

Third: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Nikos Mediterranean Feta Cheese.

KJ: Reduced Fat Cheese with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Pesto Farmers Cheese.

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Jalapeno Light Cheddar.

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Tomato & Basil Feta.

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Peppercorn Feta.

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Reduced Fat Mediterranean Feta.

KK: Rubbed-Rind Cheese with added flavor ingredients rubbed or applied on the exterior surface of the cheese only — all milks

First: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, La Bottega di BelGioioso Artigiano Aged Balsamic & Cipolline Onion.

Second: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Tuscan Herb Rubbed Fontal.

Third: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, La Bottega di BelGioioso Artigiano Vino Rosso.

KL: Cheese Curds with Flavor Added — all milks

First: WW Homestead Dairy, Iowa, Chipotle Morita White Cheddar Cheese Curds.

Second: WW Homestead Dairy, Iowa, Jalapeno Ranch White Cheddar Cheese Curds.

Third: Jisa Farmstead Cheese, Nebraska, California Garlic Pepper Nuggets.

KM: Monterey Jack with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Jalapeno Jack.

Second: Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Comstock Division, Wisconsin, Hot Pepper Jack.

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Pepper Jack.

Third: Ellsworth Cooperative Creamery, Comstock Division, Wisconsin, Ghost Pepper Jack.

Third: Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Pepper Jack.

KN: Fresh Goat Cheese with Flavor Added

First: Cypress Grove, California, Purple Haze.

Second: Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Chocolate Capri.

Third: Cypress Grove, California, Sgt. Pepper.

Third: Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Fig & Honey Chevre Log.

Third: Skamokawa Farmstead Creamery, Washington, Pistachio Rosemary Lime Chevre.

KO: Sheep Cheese with Flavor Added

First: Murray’s Cheese, New York, Hudson Flower.

Second: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Everything Bagel Brebis.

Third: Dayspring Dairy LLC, Alabama, Truffle Fresca.

Third: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Savory Brebis.

KQ: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (Set yogurts, Greek-style, dips, etc.) — all milks

First: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Sheep’s Milk Yogurt - Mission Fig.

Second: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Sheep’s Milk Yogurt - Vanilla Bean.

Third: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Sheep’s Milk Yogurt - Blueberry.

Third: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Sheep’s Milk Yogurt - American Cherry.

KR: Butter with Flavor Added ­— all milks

First: Minerva Dairy, Ohio, Smoked Maplewood Amish Roll Butter.

Second: Shatto Milk Co., Missouri, Garlic Butter.

Third: Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Coffee Butter.

Third: Epicurean Butter, Colorado, Organic Roasted Garlic Herb Butter.

Third: Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Lactantia Garlic Butter.

Third: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Culture Butter blended with Sea Salt and Maple.

KS: Cold Pack Cheese and Spreads with Flavor Added — all milks

First: Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, Rondelé Organic Garlic & Herbs Spreadable Cheese.

Second: Key Ingredient Market, Wisconsin, Key Ingredient Market Truffle Parmesan White Cheddar Spread.

Third: Key Ingredient Market, Wisconsin, Key Ingredient Market Champagne Cheddar Spread.

Third: Red Clay Gourmet, North Carolina, Hickory Smoked Cheddar Pimiento Cheese.

KV: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (Drinkable, pourable, smoothie, etc.) — all milks

First: Yodelay Yogurt, Wisconsin, Raspberry Yogurt.

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Peach Drinkable Yogurt.

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Prune Smoothie.

Third: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Strawberry Drinkable Yogurt.

L. SMOKED CHEESES

LC: Open Category — made from cow’s milk

First: Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Smoked.

Second: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Smoked Traditional Gouda.

Third: Fair Oaks Farms, Wisconsin, Smoked Gouda.

Third: Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Smoked Fontina.

LD: Smoked Cheddars — all milks

First: Cows Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Cows Creamery Appletree Smoked Cheddar — 23 months.

Second: Fromagerie L’Ancêtre Inc., Québec, L’Ancêtre Organic Le Boucané Bio.

Third: Beehive Cheese Co. LLC, Utah, Apple Walnut Smoked Promontory.

LG: Open Category — made from goat’s milk

First: Rivers Edge Chevre LLC, Oregon, Rivers Edge Chevre Up in Smoke.

Second: Boston Post Dairy LLC, Vermont, Smoking Goud.

Third: Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Smoked Capri.

LM: Smoked Italian Styles (Mozzarella, Scamorza, Bocconcini, Ovalini, etc.) — all milks

First: Loveras Market, Oklahoma, Braided Caciocavera/Hickory Smoked.

Second: Loveras Market, Oklahoma, Hickory Smoked Caciocavera.

Third: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Organic Smoked Mozzarella.

M. FARMSTEAD CHEESES

MA: Aged less than 60 days — all milks

Second: Ferndale Farmstead Cheese, Washington, Asiago Pressa.

Third: Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, Illinois, Black Goat.

Third: The Gray Barn and Farm, Massachusetts, Prufrock.

MC: Aged 60 days or more — 39-percent or higher moisture — made from cow’s milk

First: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Toma.

Second: Canal Junction Farmstead Cheese LLC, Ohio, Charloe.

Second: Cato Corner Farm LLC, Connecticut, Womanchego.

Second: Meadow Creek Dairy, Virginia, Grayson.

Second: Vermont Farmstead Cheese Co., Vermont, Lille Coulommiers Bebe.

Third: Ferndale Farmstead Cheese, Washington, Caciotta.

Third: Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Baby Toma.

ME: Aged 60 days or more — less than 39-percent moisture — made from cow’s milk

First: The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, St. Malachi.

Second: The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, St. Malachi Reserve.

Third: P A Bowen Farmstead, Maryland, Chesapeake Cheddar Reserve.

MG: Aged 60 days or more — made from goat’s milk

First: Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Greta’s Fair Haven.

Second: Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Pennsylvania, Hootenanny.

Third: LaClare Farms Specialties LLC, Wisconsin, LaClare Farms Evalon.

MS: Aged 60 days or more — made from sheep’s milk

First: Shepherd’s Way Farms, Minnesota, Friesago.

Second: Lark’s Meadow Farms LLC, Idaho, Dulcinea Reserve.

Third: Tucker Family Farm, Montana, Brontide.

MX: Aged 60 days or more — made from mixed or other milks

First: The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, The Creamery Collection Batch #13.

Second: Pennyroyal Farm, California, Boont Corners 2 Month.

Third: Fuzzy Udder Creamery, Maine, Windswept.

N. GOAT’S MILK CHEESES

NO: Fresh Rindless Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days (black ash coating permitted)

First: Laura Chenel’s Chevre, California, Original Medallion.

Second: Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Coeur de Chevre, Organic Fresh Goat Cheese Natural.

Third: Country Winds Creamery, Michigan, Fresh Chevre.

Third: Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Fresh Goat Cheese.

Third: Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Fresh Goat Cheese Natural.

NS: Fresh Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days (hand-shaped, formed or molded into pyramid, disc, drum, crottin, basket or other shape)

First: Idyll Farms Inc., Michigan, Idyll Gris 3 pound.

Second: Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Meg’s Big Sunshine.

Third: Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Ellie’s Cloudy Down.

NT: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 days

First: Yellow Springs Farms LLC, Pennsylvania, Black Diamond.

Second: La Fromagerie Alexis de Portneuf, Québec, Le Cendrillon.

Third: Briar Rose Creamery, Oregon, Lorelei.

NU: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 days

First: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Queso de Mano.

Second: Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Ode to Joy.

Third: Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Limited Edition Extra-Aged Goat.

O. SHEEP’S MILK CHEESES

OO: Fresh Rindless Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days

First: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Petit Nuage.

Second: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Plain.

Third: Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Brebis.

OT: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 days

First: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Woolly Rind.

Second: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Kinderhook Creek.

Third: Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Dirt Lover.

OU: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 days

First: Shepherds Manor Creamery, Maryland, Shepherds Manor Tomae.

Second: Fromagerie Nouvelle France, Québec, Zacharie Cloutier.

Third: Tucker Family Farm, Idaho, Harbinger.

P. MARINATED CHEESES

PC: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients — made from cow’s milk

First: Brush Creek Creamery, Idaho, Marinated Labneh.

Second: BelGioioso Cheese Inc., New York, BelGioioso Hand Braided Fresh Mozzarella Pesto Marinade.

Second: The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Moon Rabbit.

Second: The Farm at Doe Run, Pennsylvania, Bathed in Victory.

Third: Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Reserve Balsamic BellaVitano.

Third: Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Reserve Merlot BellaVitano.

PG: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients — made from goat’s milk

First: CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Aleppo-Urfa Chili & Lemon.

Second: CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: California Dill Pollen & Garlic.

Second: Dancing Goats Dairy, Massachusetts, Marinated Chèvre.

Second: Laura Chenel’s Chevre, California, Spicy marinated Cabecou with Jalapeño 3.5 pounds.

Second: Laura Chenel’s Chevre, California, Cabecou marinated in Herbs 3.5 pounds.

Third: CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Smoked Sea Salt & Rosemary.

Third: Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Red Leaf.

PS: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients — made from sheep’s milk

Second: Dayspring Dairy LLC, Alabama, Tomato Basil Feta.

Q. CULTURED MILK AND CREAM PRODUCTS

QD: Yogurts — Plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from goat’s milk

First: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capretta Low Fat Goat Yogurt.

Second: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capretta Greek Goat Yogurt.

Third: LaClare Farms Specialties LLC, Wisconsin, LaClare Farms Goat Milk Yogurt - plain.

QF: Crème Fraiche and Sour Cream Products — made from cow’s milk

First: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Crème Fraîche.

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Sour Cream (Old World Style).

Third: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Sour Cream.

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Sour Cream.

QK: Kefir, Drinkable Yogurt, Buttermilk and Other Drinkable Cultured Products — all milks

First: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Graziers Grass Fed Kefir - Plain.

Second: Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, California, Redwood Hill Farm Goat Milk Kefir.

Third: Karoun Dairies Inc., California, Drinkable Kefir.

QL: Labneh, Greek Style Yogurt and Other Strained Cultured Products — all milks

First: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey 2-percent Greek Yogurt.

Second: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt Old World Style.

Third: Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt Traditional.

QS: Yogurts — plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from sheep’s milk

First: Bellwether Farms, California, Plain Sheep Yogurt.

Second: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, New York, Sheep’s Milk Yogurt - Plain.

Third: Fromagerie Nouvelle France, Québec, Yogourt de brebis Nature/plain.

QX: Yogurts — plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from mixed or other milks

Second: Annabella, Colombia, Bufala Yogurt, Plain.

QY: Yogurts — plain with No Additional Ingredients — made from cow’s milk

First: Redwood Hill Farm & Creamery, California, Green Valley Organics Lactose Free Yogurt.

Second: Narragansett Creamery, Rhode Island, Whole Milk Plain Yogurt.

Second: Snowville Creamery LLC, Ohio, Plain 2-percent Yogurt.

Third: Laura Chenel’s Chevre/Saint Benoit Creamery, California, Organic Jersey cow milk yogurt.

R. BUTTERS

RC: Salted Butter with or without cultures — made form cow’s milk

First: CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, Organic Valley Salted Butter.

Second: Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Massachusetts, Cabot Salted Butter.

Third: Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Lactantia Premium Cultured salted butter.

Third: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Organic Salted Butter.

RM: Butter with or without cultures — made from goat’s milk

First: Mt. Sterling Cheese Co-op, Wisconsin, Whey Cream Butter.

Second: Trickling Springs Creamery, Pennsylvania, Trickling Springs FarmFriend Goat Butter, unsalted.

RO: Unsalted Butter with or without cultures — made from cow’s milk

First: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Cultured Butter Unsalted.

Second: Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Unsalted Cultured Butter.

Second: CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, Organic Valley European Style Cultured Butter, Unsalted.

Third: Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Graziers Grass Fed Vat Cultured Euro-Style Butter - Unsalted.

S. CHEESE SPREADS

SC: Open Category Cold Pack Style — all milks

First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cold Pack.

Second: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Black Creek Sharp Cheddar Cheese Cold Pack.

Third: Montchevre-Betin Inc., Wisconsin, Oh-La-La! Fresh Spreadable Goat Cheese.

Third: Pine River Pre-Pack Inc., Wisconsin, Chunky Bleu Cold Pack Cheese Food.

T. WASHED RIND CHEESES

TB: Soft-Ripened Washed Rind — high moisture over 42 percent — all milks

First: Murray’s Cheese, Vermont, Greensward.

Second: Winding Road Artisan Cheese, Alberta, RDB.

Third: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Funkmeister.

Third: Mt. Townsend Creamery, Washington, Off Kilter.

TC: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days — up to 42 percent moisture — made from cow’s milk

First: Emmi Roth USA, Wisconsin, Organic Grand Cru Reserve.

Second: Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Alpha Tolman.

Third: Murray’s Cheese, Vermont, Project X.

TG: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days — up to 42 percent moisture — made from goat’s milk

First: Central Coast Creamery, California, DreamWeaver.

First: Upper Canada Cheese Co., Ontario, Nosey Goat.

Second: Baetje Farms LLC, Missouri, Fleur de la Vallee.

Second: Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont, Slyboro.

Third: Firefly Farms, Maryland, Cabra La Mancha.

Third: Haystack Mountain Creamery, Colorado, Sunlight.

TR: Raclette-style — Aged over 45 days — all milks

First: Farms for City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Reading.

Second: Nicasio Valley Cheese Co., California, San Geronimo.

Third: Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Valis.

TS: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days — up to 42 percent moisture — made from sheep’s milk

First: Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Cestino Pecora.

Second: Lark’s Meadow Farms LLC, Idaho, Alto Valle.

Third: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Anabasque.

TX: Open Category — Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days — up to 42 percent moisture — made from mixed or other milks

First: Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Lenberg Farms Classic Reserve by Celebrity, Zoey.

Second: Boston Post Dairy LLC, Vermont, Gisele.

Third: Tomales Farmstead Creamery, California, Atika.

CMN


U.S. cheese production up
3.2 percent from year ago

August 4, 2017

WASHINGTON — Total U.S. cheese production, excluding cottage cheese, was 1.03 billion pounds in June, 3.2 percent above June 2016’s 997.5 million pounds, according to data released Thursday by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Dairy Production chart.)

June cheese production was 2.5 percent below May 2017’s 1.06 billion pounds, but when adjusted for the length of the months, June cheese production was 0.8 percent higher than May production on an average daily basis.

Italian-type cheese production totaled 448.9 million pounds in June, 3.1 percent above production a year earlier. Production of Mozzarella, the most-produced Italian-type cheese, totaled 349.5 million pounds, also up 3.1 percent from a year earlier.

American-type cheese production totaled 403.8 million pounds in June, up 3.0 percent from production in June 2016. Production of Cheddar, the most-produced American-type cheese, totaled 288.1 million pounds, up 2.8 percent from June 2016.

Wisconsin led the nation’s cheese production with 270.9 million pounds produced in June, up 1.3 percent from its production a year earlier. California followed with 207.2 million pounds, down 0.2 percent from a year earlier.

The next four cheese-producing states in June were Idaho with 82.9 million pounds, up 2.1 percent from a year earlier; New York with 69.0 million pounds, up 3.3 percent; New Mexico with 63.6 million pounds, up 6.7 percent; and Minnesota with 60.3 million pounds, up 10.9 percent.

NASS reports U.S. butter production in June totaled 140.6 million pounds, down 4.8 percent from June 2016’s 147.7 million pounds. June butter production was down 14.0 percent from May 2016’s 163.5 million pounds; when accounting for the length of the months, June butter production was down 11.1 percent on an average daily basis.

California led the nation’s butter production with 40.5 million pounds in June, down 12.0 percent from its production a year earlier.

CMN


IDFA-ordered tool quantifies
dairy’s economic impact

August 4, 2017

WASHINGTON — A new interactive economic impact tool commissioned by the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) shows the economic stimulus provided nationally and locally by dairy foods companies and their suppliers.

IDFA engaged John Dunham and Associates, a leading economic research firm, for the study, “2017 Economic Impact Study of the Dairy Products Industry,” to measure the dairy processing sector’s impact on a national level, by state and by congressional district. In addition, a comprehensive interactive tool allows users to see the economic impact of jobs, wages, taxes and overall economic impact generated directly by dairy plants and companies, as well as the multiplier effect of these investments across the supply chain.

The study measures the combined impact of the dairy products industry, as defined by the production of fluid milk products (including cream, sour cream, cottage cheese and yogurt), butter, cheese, dried products, ice cream and whey; the wholesaling and distribution of dairy products; and the retailing of dairy products, both in food stores, and in restaurants and ice cream scoop shops, on the entire economy of the United States in 2017. Retailing includes locations where dairy products are consumed “on-premise,” such as restaurants, ice cream scoop shops (which may or may not manufacture their own ice cream) and amusement parks. “Off-premise” retail outlets are supermarkets, convenience stores, warehouse stores and similar locations. The data come from a variety of government and private sources.

“IDFA wanted a strong, visual way to demonstrate that the U.S. dairy products industry is a powerful economic driver locally and nationally,” says Dave Carlin, IDFA senior vice president of legislative affairs and economic policy. “With negotiations underway on the farm bill, trade agreements and regulatory reform, the timing was right to consolidate industry data and capture this snapshot of our industry that would speak for us on the significant economic clout our members have.”

According to the data, the U.S. dairy foods industry today directly employs more than 977,700 workers, pays $39.46 billion in wages and contributes more than $206.89 billion to the national economy. (See graphic on previous page.)

The tool can be accessed online at www.idfa.org/resource-center/economic-impact. From there, users can click on individual states — and even districts within those states — to get specific data on jobs, wages and other economic impacts of local and state dairy sectors. The site also features an FAQ section as well as information on study methodology.

“I think this better explains who we are as an industry and how we relate to policymakers’ states and districts,” Carlin says. “We now can educate them on a particular issue and show how important it is to their district or state. It’s an additional tool in our tool box so they can better understand how the dairy industry fits into the economic landscape.”

CMN


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Today's Cheese Spot Trading
August 18, 2017


Barrels: $1.7500 (+6 1/2)
Blocks: $1.7550 (+2)


Click here for more market activity
Cheese Production
U.S. Total June
1.03 bil. lbs.


Milk Production
U.S. Total June
18.047 bil. lbs.

Guest Columnist

Survive family businesses

Edward Zimmerman, The Food Connector

CWT: Creating opportunities for America’s farmers

Jim Tillison, Cooperatives Working Together

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