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Gouda wheel from Babcock Hall Dairy wins WDE contest

August 23, 2019

MADISON, Wis. — A Gouda cheese wheel made by Babcock Hall Dairy, Madison, Wisconsin, was selected as the Cheese and Butter Grand Champion at this week’s World Dairy Expo Championship Dairy Product Contest.

A 2% Lowfat Cottage Cheese made by Prairie Farms Dairy, Carbondale, Illinois, was selected as the Grade A Grand Champion, and Sweet Me Lemon Bar ice cream produced by Kemps, Cedarburg, Wisconsin, was the Ice Cream Grand Champion contest.

This year’s contest, sponsored by the Wisconsin Dairy Products Association (WDPA), received a record number 1,536 entries for cheese, butter, fluid milk, yogurt, cottage cheese, ice cream, sour cream, sherbet, cultured milk, sour cream dips, whipping cream, whey and creative/innovative products from dairy processors throughout North America.

“This year’s contest was extremely successful, reflecting how much dairy processors have come to embrace this unique and special event,” says Brad Legreid, executive director, WDPA, which conducts the annual World Dairy Expo Championship Dairy Product Contest. “As the only all-dairy product contest of its kind in the world, the dairy industry has quickly learned the myriad benefits accrued from participating in the contest. Winning companies parlay their success into unprecedented marketing and retail sales opportunities, while other companies receive valuable insights from the 50 highly-trained sensory experts whom judge their products.

“Everyone benefits from this contest, including the first-place winners, all participating companies, food banks and college students pursuing dairy careers,” Legreid adds. “This contest is a complete win-win for everyone in the dairy industry.”

Judging was held Aug. 20-22 at Madison Area Technical College Culinary Arts School in Madison, Wisconsin.

The contest’s auction will be held Oct. 1 at World Dairy Expo in Madison, at which time all category first-place winners will be auctioned off. A portion of the proceeds from the contest auction will be used to fund scholarships awarded annually to deserving students pursuing careers in the dairy industry. For more information on the contest and auction please call 608-836-3336.

Full contest results were not available by press time but will be published in next week’s issue of Cheese Market News.

CMN


Dairy groups send letter urging strong trade deal with Japan

August 23, 2019

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC), National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) and the International Dairy Foods Association joined 70 dairy associations, cooperatives and companies in sending a letter this week to U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, asking the U.S. government to capitalize on the conclusion of Japan’s national elections and quickly finalize a strong trade deal with Japan to secure market access for the U.S. dairy industry.

“Given that Japan is an established market with a growing demand for dairy products, the successful negotiation of a robust trade agreement with Japan will bring a much-needed boost to the economic health of the U.S. dairy industry and set our industry up on a path to compete effectively there moving forward. Securing robust dairy export opportunities into this overseas market will be critical to restoring confidence for our dairy farmers and processors across the country,” the letter says.

The groups note the continued success of the U.S. dairy industry relies on stable export opportunities to markets abroad, and Japan represents a major opportunity to expand growth. However, the Japan-EU agreement and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) have allowed the European Union, New Zealand and Australia to position themselves to take over sales from the U.S. dairy industry, they say. Swift negotiation of a trade deal with Japan that builds upon the best components of the Japan-EU agreement and the CPTPP is urgently needed for U.S. dairy farmers and processors, they add.

Leaders of U.S. cheese and dairy companies detail the need for a strong agreement with Japan.

“Eroding dairy competitiveness in Japan is at a critical point. The time to re-level the tariff and access playing field is right now,” says Stan Ryan, president and CEO, Darigold. “Today Darigold supplies over 50% of the U.S. American-style cheese exports to Japan. Those sales will soon be lost as competitor trade deals take effect.”

Sue Taylor, vice president of dairy policy and procurement for Leprino Foods Co., says Japan has been an important market for Leprino’s U.S.-produced products for years.

“We invested heavily in developing lactose and whey protein exports several decades ago and, more recently, Mozzarella exports into this important market and believe that the market has significant further growth potential. We risk losing these sales and growth opportunities to competitors who recently finalized preferential trade agreements unless the US negotiates a strong agreement,” Taylor says. “We are very supportive of the administration’s efforts to secure an agreement that allows us to retain and grow this important market.”

USDEC and NMPF note the United States exported $270 million in dairy products to Japan in 2018 and say there is room for further growth. However, they warn that without a strong U.S.-Japan trade agreement, half of U.S. dairy sales to Japan could be result in $5.4 billion in lost export sales when Japan’s deals with the EU and CPTPP are fully phased in.

CMN


July milk production holds even as cow numbers contract

August 23, 2019

WASHINGTON — Milk production in the 24 major states during July totaled 17.48 billion pounds, up 0.1% from July 2018’s 17.45 billion pounds, according to preliminary data released this week by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). (All figures are rounded. Please see CMN’s Milk Production chart.)

June 2019 revised production, at 17.37 billion pounds, was up 0.2% from June 2018. The June revision represents an increase of 26 million pounds or 0.1% from last month’s preliminary production estimate.

Production per cow in the 24 major milk-producing states averaged 1,993 pounds in July, 16 pounds above July 2018. The number of milk cows on farms in the 24 major milk-producing states was 8.77 million head, 60,000 head less than July 2018 and 8,000 head less than June 2019, according to NASS.

For the entire United States, milk production during July totaled 18.33 billion pounds, virtually unchanged from a year earlier. Production per cow in the United States averaged 1,969 pounds in July, 17 pounds above July 2018.

The number of milk cows on U.S. farms was 9.31 million head, 82,000 head less than July 2018, and 9,000 head less than June 2019.

California, the nation’s leading milk-producing state, saw a 2.5% increase from the previous July to 3.38 billion pounds in July 2019. The increase was driven by an increase in production per cow, with average production climbing to 1,955 pounds, up 55 pounds from July 2018. There were 1.73 million cows on California dairies in July 2019, 6,000 head less than July 2018 but unchanged from June 2019.

Wisconsin followed with 2.61 billion pounds of milk in July, down 1.0% from its production a year earlier. Production per cow in Wisconsin averaged 2,055 pounds, down 10 pounds from July 2018. There were 1.27 million cows on farms in Wisconsin in July, down 6,000 head from July 2018 but unchanged from a month earlier.

Among the 24 major milk-producing states, several states experienced declines of more than 4% compared to July 2018. Virginia experienced the biggest decline, down 11.2% from its production the previous year. NASS reports Illinois was down 7.7%, Pennsylvania was down 7.6%, Arizona was down 6.7%, Ohio was down 6.0%,Indiana was down 4.9%, and Utah was down 4.5%.

CMN



Whalen Foods specializes in finding customers for ‘mistake’ cheese

By Kate Sander

CHASKA, Minn. — Mistakes, surplus products, off spec products and outdated products. For cheese manufacturers, these words immediately conjure up problems, hassles and, of course, financial losses.
No one likes them, but in the course of making cheese they are bound to occasionally occur. And when they happen, companies need to have a plan for handling them.

Enter Tom Whalen, Whalen Foods, who has made it his business, as he puts it, to “make your boo-boos go away.”
Whalen may be among the few who actually like mistakes. For the past two decades, he’s made it his company’s business to fix cheese and other food manufacturers’ mistakes — or at least find a way to make the “problem products” less problematic.

Whalen Foods Inc. is a food and marketing company that specializes in edible and inedible products. Its goal is to provide food manufacturers with new outlets for their products, as well as provide buyers with specialty product opportunities. This could be surplus cheese, cheese wheels where the rind didn’t develop correctly, cheese trim, cheese that doesn’t peel from a wrapper correctly or any other number of problems that make the cheese less than ideal for customers with exacting specifications.

In addition to cheese, Whalen Foods also handles other surplus and off-spec products, including chicken nuggets, fish and pet food. About 30% of the company’s business is in the dairy industry. Pet food is the company’s biggest portion of business, amounting to about half of sales, and another 20% is in feed.

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Marinated cheeses add extra flavor to culinary experience

August 16, 2019

By Alyssa Mitchell

MADISON, Wis. — With grilling season well underway, meat marinades may be top-of-mind, but marinades also can add something extra to cheeses and assist consumers in discovering new uses and flavor profiles.

Laura Chenel, Sonoma, California, makers of handcrafted goat cheese, offers a line of Marinated Goat Cheeses in three varieties — thyme and rosemary; jalapeno chili; and black truffle.

“This product was introduced in part so consumers would have another way to enjoy goat cheese,” says Vanessa Chang, brand manager, Laura Chenel.

“I think many consumers think about goat cheese as either being flavored or being plain and sprinkled in a salad,” Chang says. “By marinating it, we can show goat cheese lovers there’s a new way to enjoy the cheese with personalization and customization.”

Goat cheese’s versatility enables it to be paired well with different flavors, Chang adds, noting Laura Chenel’s three offerings span a range of flavor profiles.

“With these flavors, not just the cheese is versatile, but the oil is, too,” she says. “It can be used to dress a salad, toss a pasta, as a dip or with bread.

Marinated cheeses also help to take the guesswork out of building a cheese board, Chang says.

“The flavored oil lends itself well to pairing with meat or bread,” she says. “Particularly our thyme and rosemary is very herb forward and offers a classic flavor profile. Our jalapeno chili offers a more bold flavor for those who love spice, while our black truffle offers a more luxurious indulgence and is very popular around the holidays.”

CHEVOO, Healdsburg, California, offers an array of marinated goat cheese varieties. Co-Founder and CEO Gerard Tuck, who hails from Australia and founded the company with his wife, Susan, says marinated goat cheeses are very popular in their native country and are getting great reception in the U.S. market.

CHEVOO marinated goat cheeses are made from high-quality goat curd and hand-blended with combinations of spices, herbs, chilies and pollens — then paired with an extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) that has been infused with crushed botanicals for eight weeks — hence the name CHEVOO.

CHEVOO offers more traditional varieties like smoked sea salt & rosemary and dill pollen & garlic as well as more unique varieties like urfa chili & lemon and fennel pollen & orange.

“They’ve gotten a great reception here in the states,” Tuck says. “Once someone tastes our product, we have a really great success rate at them becoming fans. Especially if someone understands the different ways you can use it.

“The two go-to uses are for a cheese board with crackers and bread, and a more kitchen home-cooked meal use, such as on a salad and using the infused oil as part of a dressing,” he adds. “From there, you can really add it to anything in the kitchen that needs some elevation, a little additional flavor without much extra work.”

While a popular option, goat cheese isn’t the only cheese type that pairs with a marinade. Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese, Waterloo, Wisconsin, offers consumers an award-winning marinated ciliegine size (cherry size) of its Fresh Mozzarella in retail and foodservice containers. The marinade features an olive oil/canola oil blend with the company’s own spice mix, says Debbie Crave, president, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese.

Crave says the product came about in part by consumer request, and the company is thrilled with how it’s been received.
“We call it an ‘appetizer in a cup,’” she says. “We encourage consumers to enjoy the cheese, but they also can drizzle the marinade onto toast with bruschetta or veggies. It also adds a lot to a cheese board.”

Crave adds the product is a go-to item for retail and even foodservice.

“It’s perfect for a store that might have an olive bar — the work is done,” she says.

• Marinating methods

When looking to marinate cheese, Tuck says the most important part happens before the oil is added to CHEVOO’s jars.
“For our smoked sea salt and rosemary variety, the goat cheese is blended with salt and black pepper, while separately the oil is infused with rosemary for about eight weeks,” he says.

The amount of time the marinade and cheese are put together is not particularly important, he adds.

“Once the blended flavor cheese and the flavored oil are in the jar together, whether they’re marinating for one day or one month, the experience is quite similar,” he says.

At Laura Chenel, the method is really about preserving the cheese, Chang says.

“The cheese is the superstar. It is the same one we use for other products, featuring fresh milk from regional family farms. We form the curds and dry them; drying it slightly ensures that the structure stays intact until our customers get to enjoy it at home,” she says. “It sits in the marinade for as long as it needs to be on the shelf to preserve it as it ages.”

Because Fresh Mozzarella has a 32-day shelf life, it’s ideal to consume it upon packaging and purchase, Crave says.
“It’s good right out the door,” she says. “We say from day 1 to day 30, go for it.”

Tuck says he feels goat cheese and other soft cheeses are ideal for marinating because of their softer texture and mouthfeel.

“I’ve tried some hard cheeses marinated in olive oil, and there’s something kind of unpleasant about the mouthfeel. You get the texture of hard cheese crumbling in your mouth, while the oil runs around that. But with goat cheese, the cheese and oil commingle and mix together much better,” he says.

Cheesemakers agree marinade does not significantly impact the shelf life of the cheese.

• Outside the box

Versatility is king when it comes to marinated cheese.

Chang says Laura Chenel’s big push this year has been to get consumers to think about goat cheese “out of the box” — and the marinades do just that.

“I think a lot of people aren’t sure about when and where to use goat cheese, and we’re hoping this helps them to find new uses for it,” she says. “It offers an impactful bang for your buck, with multiple products in one, and lends itself to well to cooking occasions and entertaining options.”

Crave says Crave Brothers offers recipe ideas on its website as well as on its retail packages under the lid.
In a recent recipe contest, one consumer found a new and unique use for Crave’s marinated Fresh Mozzarella in a traditional African dish called Shakshouka.

Shakshouka is North African dish made with eggs poached in a flavorful sauce of tomatoes, peppers, onions, and spiced with cumin.

“This version crosses over to the other side of the Mediterranean Sea to give the recipe an Italian twist,” Crave says. “Along with perfectly poached eggs, marinated ciliegine gently melt into the warm tomato sauce. It is served with toasted crostini to sop up every last bite.”

CMN


Dairy industry offers testimony at latest hearing on EU tariffs

August 16, 2019

WASHINGTON — Representatives from U.S. dairy and cheese organizations testified last week during a public hearing regarding proposed action, including tariffs on cheeses and other products, in the World Trade Organization (WTO) dispute against the European Union (EU) in response to EU subsidies on large civil aircraft.

In April, the office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) began a process under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 to identify products form the EU to which additional duties may be applied until the EU removes those subsidies. Comments on these tariffs were received in writing and at a public hearing May 15-16. In July, the Section 301 Committee invited comments on a supplemental list of products that potentially could be subject to additional duties.

USTR can help compel EU compliance with its WTO commitments while helping to mitigate the dairy trade imbalance between the United States and EU with some of the dairy lines targeted for tariffs, according to Peter Vitaliano, vice president for economic policy and market research, National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF).

Vitaliano also notes trade barriers such as the EU’s use of geographical indications to block U.S. companies from exporting their cheese with the same or similar names to the EU as well as to EU trade partners.

“While the EU restricts our cheese exports, we provide a large and lucrative market to EU exports of those very same products to the U.S. So much so, that the U.S. ran a $1.6 billion dairy trade deficit with the EU last year with cheese alone accounting for approximately a billion of that,” he testified. “In light of this clear disparity of treatment, we encourage the U.S. to ensure that the tariff codes covering cheeses we are blocked from shipping to the EU, if accurately labeled, are captured on USTR’s final retaliation list.”

Specifically, Vitaliano points to proposed tariffs in the most recent Federal Register notice on five lines that he says would be strong additional retaliation candidates on a final retaliation list: processed Gruyere; Blue-veined cheese in original loaves; Edam and Gouda; and two import categories of Romano, Reggiano, Parmesan, Provolone and Provoletti cheese from cow’s milk.

Meanwhile, the Cheese Importers Association of America (CIAA) in its testimony urged USTR to remove all proposed cheese subheadings from its proposed tariff action, citing the “severe negative economic impact” these would have on U.S. jobs and consumers, U.S. food safety and USDA’s Dairy Import License Program.

Robert Stang, part of the CIAA’s legal counsel and government relations team, testified that the cheese importing community covers thousands of employees, and these tariffs would significantly burden the entire supply chain, resulting in job losses due to decreased imports. Increased costs due to these tariffs also would be passed directly on to consumers, he says.
Stang also says food safety would be a concern.

“It will be difficult for companies to overhaul supply chains on short notice, find alternative sources able to provide the unique flavors and quality associated with EU cheese and cheese products, and adhere to U.S. sanitation and safety standards,” he says.

Additionally, imposing Section 301 tariffs on these cheeses will disturb USDA’s dairy import licensing program and the associated tariff-rate quota system, Stang says, noting that the historic licenses are issued to companies for specific cheeses from specific countries, and the quota covered by one license cannot be transferred to another license that covers a different cheese or a different country.

“Imposing these additional tariffs on top of the existing high rate of duty will upend this administrative program because our members will import fewer cheeses from European countries covered under their historic licenses, causing a loss of historic quota allocations and reallocations that will not immediately or easily revert to pre-Section 301 tariff levels should the tariffs be rescinded,” he says.

The CIAA notes that USTR’s proposed action would cover cheeses under 59 different tariff subheadings, and it is asking that USTR not include any of these cheese products to Section 301 duties.

CMN


USDA lowers milk production forecast for both 2019, 2020

August 16, 2019

WASHINGTON — USDA lowered its milk production forecast for 2019 and 2020 and its dairy commodity price forecasts for 2020 in its latest World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report released this week.

The milk production forecast for 2019 is lowered to 217.9 billion pounds, down 300 million pounds from last month’s report, and for 2020 to 221.4 billion pounds, down 400 million pounds from last month. The reduced production forecast is due to expectations of a smaller dairy herd and slower growth in milk per cow, USDA says.

The fat-basis import forecast for 2019 is raised from last month on strong demand for imported butter, while the 2019 fat-basis export forecast is reduced slightly. For 2020, the fat-basis import forecast is raised on continued strong import demand for butter, while the fat-basis export forecast is reduced on slowing sales of butterfat, USDA says.

For skim-solids basis imports, the 2019 forecast is raised on higher imports of milk protein concentrates and other dairy products, while 2019 skim-solids basis exports are reduced primarily on weaker-than-expected sales of nonfat dry milk (NDM), USDA says.

For 2020, the skim-solids basis import forecast is raised, but the export forecast is lowered on expected continued weak demand for NDM and increased global competition, the report says.

For 2019, cheese, butter and whey price forecasts are raised, while the NDM price forecast is reduced on current price weakness and slowing demand.

Cheese prices for 2019 now are forecast to average $1.685 per pound, up from $1.660 in last month’s report. Butter is forecast to average $2.320, up from $2.315, and whey is forecast to average $0.380, up from $0.375. NDM, meanwhile, is forecast down from $1.020 last month to $1.005 in this month’s report on current price weakness and slowing demand, USDA says.

For 2020, whey is steady at $0.360 per pound while cheese is forecast at $1.725, down from July’s forecast of $1.730; butter at $2.335, down from $2.345; and NDM at $1.015, down from $1.045, USDA says.

Class III and all-milk price forecasts for 2019 are raised this month to $16.30 and $18.30 per hundredweight, respectively, on higher forecast cheese and whey prices, while the Class IV forecast is lowered this month to $16.30 as the lower forecast NDM price more than offsets the higher butter price, the report says.

For 2020, milk price forecasts are lowered, with Class III forecast to average $16.55 per hundredweight, down from $16.65 last month; Class IV at $16.45, down from $16.75; and the all-milk price at $18.80, down from $18.85.

CMN


Stockinghall from Murray’s, Old Chatham wins ACS contest

August 9, 2019

RICHMOND, Va. — Two cheese collaborations from New York affineurs landed king of the hill and top of the heap at the American Cheese Society’s (ACS) 2019 Judging & Competition, while a 15-year-old newcomer from California came in third-place overall.

Murray’s Cheese earned Best of Show for Stockinghall, a clothbound Cheddar originally made by Old Chatham Creamery, Groton, New York, and aged in Murray’s Long Island City caves.

“We worked with Old Chatham Creamery for several years to make Stockinghall, which is their only Cheddar,” says Josh Windsor, affineur for Murray’s Cheese. “Aged Cheddars are finicky and hard to produce — this cheese was truly a labor of love.”

Wegmans Food Markets received second Best of Show for Professor’s Brie, a mixed sheep and cow’s milk cheese also originally made by Old Chatham Creamery and aged in Wegmans’ caves in Rochester, New York.

“It has been a wonderful experience to work with our team to create our cheese caves in Rochester and work with cheesemakers on unique cheeses for Wegmans,” says Cathy Gaffney, vice president at Wegmans Food Markets and ACS board president. “This award is proof that this model of production can create phenomenal American artisan cheese.”

Professor’s Brie is named after David Galton, owner of Old Chatham and Gaffney’s former professor at Cornell University.

“We’re so proud of the Old Chatham team and our partners,” Galton says. “We strive to make cheeses that meet the high standards of our partners, who are truly the best creameries in the American artisan cheese industry.”

Third place Best in Show was Aries, created by 15-year-old cheesemaker Avery Jones under her Shooting Star Creamery brand. Jones is the daughter of Reggie Jones of Central Coast Creamery, Paso Robles, California.

“Watching Avery become the cheesemaker she is today has been amazing,” says Lindsey Mendes, production manager, Central Coast Creamery. “Cheesemaking takes a lot of blood, sweat and tears, and it’s heartening to see that the younger generation is so passionate about the industry. This win couldn’t have happened without the entire Central Coast Creamery team.”

This year’s competition drew 1,742 entries from 257 companies, representing 35 U.S. states and four Canadian provinces, as well as Mexico and South America. ACS gave a total 433 awards, including 139 gold medals, 143 silver medals and 151 bronze medals.

“It’s an exciting year for American cheese,” says Nora Weiser, executive director, ACS. “We have new producers, new production models and fresh new faces that are pushing the envelope and expanding creativity and collaboration within American artisan cheese.”

First-place awards were not given in every class. The award winners include:

R: BUTTERS

RC: Salted Butter with or without cultures - made from cow’s milk

First: Roy M. Philippi, Graf Creamery Inc., Wisconsin, Brethren Butter Amish Style Handrolled Salted Butter

Second: Team McMinnville, CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, CROPP/Organic Valley Salted Butter

Third: Team Chaseburg, CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, Organic Valley Salted Butter

RO: Unsalted Butter with or without cultures - made from cow’s milk

First: Team Chaseburg, CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, Organic Valley European Style Cultured Butter, Unsalted

Second: Team McMinnville, CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, CROPP/Organic Valley Pasture Butter, Cultured

Third: Team Chaseburg, CROPP Cooperative/Organic Valley, Wisconsin, Organic Valley Cultured Butter, Unsalted

Third: Team West Springfield, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Massachusetts, Cabot Unsalted Butter

RM: Butter with or without cultures - made from goat’s milk

Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Bella Capra Goat Butter

Third: Pieter Van Oudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Celebrity Butter (Salted)

Q: CULTURED MILK AND CREAM PRODUCTS

QF: Creme Fraiche and Sour Cream Products - made from cow’s milk

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Creme Agria (Sour Cream)

Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Creme Fraiche

Third: Team Michoacan, V&V Supremo Foods, Illinois, Crema Supremo Sour Cream

QK: Kefir, Drinkable Yogurt, Buttermilk, and Other Drinkable Cultured Products - all milks

First: Team Weber’s Farm Store, Nasonville Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Plain Kefir

Second: Branden Brown, Trinity Valley, New York, Creamline Whole Cultured Buttermilk

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Jocoque

Third: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies LLC, California, Karoun Whole Milk Kefir Drink

QL: Labneh, Greek Style Yogurt, and Other Strained Cultured Products - all milks

First: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Heroes Greek Yogurt

Second: Eric Weidman, Siggi’s Dairy, Wisconsin, Siggi’s Triple Cream Plain Skyr

Second: Eric Weidman, Siggi’s Dairy, Wisconsin, Siggi’s 4% Fat Plain Skyr

Second: Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt Traditional

Second: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Plain Organic Cow Yogurt

Third: Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Greek Yogurt Old World

Third: Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey 2% Greek Yogurt

QY: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from cow’s milk

First: Mark Federico, Narragansett Creamery, Rhode Island, Whole Milk Plain Yogurt

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Plain Stir Yogurt

Second: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies LLC, California, Bulgarian Yogurt

Third: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies LLC, California, Armenian Yogurt

QD: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from goat’s milk

First: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capretta Low Fat Goat Yogurt

Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capretta Non-Fat Goat Yogurt

Third: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capretta Rich & Creamy Goat Yogurt

QS: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from sheep’s milk

First: Dylan Bush, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Old Chatham Creamery Nature’s Perfect Original Sheep Yogurt

Second: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Plain Sheep Yogurt

Third: Rebecca King, Garden Variety Cheese, California, Sheep Yogurt

QX: Yogurts - Plain with No Additional Ingredients - made from mixed, or other milks

Second: A. Tabares, Annabella LLC, Antioquia, Colombia Water Buffalo Yogurt-Plain

E: CHEDDARS

EA: Aged Cheddar - aged 13 months through 23 months - all milks

First: Kerry Henning, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Stag

First: Team Cabot Creamery, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Founders Private Stock

Second: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, New York, Flagship

Third: Cows Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Extra Old Cheddar

Third: Cows Creamery, Prince Edward Island, 2 Year Old Cheddar

EC: Cheddar - aged through 12 months - made from cow’s milk

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, English Hollow Cheddar

First: Cabot Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Cave Aged Cheddar

Second: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Aged Cheddar

Third: Kylie Schriever and Thomas Queeney, Pennland Pure, Maryland, Sharpsburg Cheddar

EG: Cheddar - aged through 12 months - made from goat’s, sheep’s, buffalo’s, mixed, or other milk

First: Saguaro Creamery, Salvatore BKLYN, Arizona, Route 66

Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Capra Bianca Aged Goat Cheddar

Second: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Sheep Milk Cheddar

Third: Lindsey Mendes, Central Coast Creamery, California, Goat Cheddar

EX: Mature Cheddar - aged 24 months through 47 months - all milks

First: Kerry Henning, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek Vat 17 World Cheddar

Second: Rogue Creamery Cheddar Production Team, Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Mount Mazama Cheese

Third: Tillamook Team 1, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Extra Sharp Cheddar

Third: Wayne Hintz, Springside Cheese Corp., Wisconsin, 2 Year Aged Cheddar

Third: Cows Creamery, Prince Edward Island, 3 Year Old Cheddar

Third: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Four Year Flagship

EE: Mature Cheddar - aged 48 or more months - all milks

First: Kerry Henning, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Imperial Buck

First: Team Cabot Creamery, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Centennial

Second: Team Cabot Creamery, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, Vermont, Cabot Old School Cheddar

Third: Winchester Cheddar Team, Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Balderson Heritage Cheddar - 5 year Cheddar

EW: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen - aged through 12 months - all milks

First: Old Chatham Creamery, Murray’s Cheese, New York, Stockinghall

Second: Team Grafton, Grafton Village Cheese, Vermont, Traditional Clothbound Cheddar

Third: Cabot Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Cabot Clothbound

EB: Cheddar wrapped in cloth, linen - aged 13 or more months - all milks

First: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagship Reserve

Second: Cows Creamery, Prince Edward Island, Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar

Third: Rick Woods, Vermont Farmstead Cheese Co., Vermont, Cloth Bound Windsordale

F: BLUE MOLD CHEESES

FC: Rindless Blue-veined - made from cow’s milk

First: Team Emmi Roth - Seymour, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Gorgonzola

Second: Rueben Nilsson & CoF Team, Caves of Faribault-Prairie Farms, Minnesota, AmaBlu

Third: Salemville Cheesemakers, Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Salemville Blue Cheese

FG: Rindless Blue-veined - made from goat’s milk

Second: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Barneveld Blue

Second: FireFly Farms, Maryland, Black and Blue

FS: Rindless Blue-veined - made from sheep’s milk

First: Eric Anderson, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Ewe’s Blue

Second: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Little Boy Blue

Third: Jodi Ohlsen Read, Shepherd’s Way Farms Inc., Minnesota, Big Woods Blue

FX: Rindless Blue-veined - made from mixed, or other milks

Second: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, EWE CALF to be KIDding Blue

Second: Tony Ellis, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Gorgonzola with Sheep’s Milk

FK: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating - made from cow’s milk

First: Kuba Hemmerling and Team, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes Bay Blue

Second: Arethusa Farm Dairy Cheese Team, Arethusa Farm Dairy, Connecticut, Arethusa Blue

Third: Jasper Hill Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Bayley Hazen Blue

Third: Rueben Nilsson & CoF Team, Caves of Faribault-Prairie Farms, Minnesota, Felix

FL: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating - made from goat’s milk

Second: Rhonda Butler and Gail Huston, Asgaard Dairy Inc., New York, Blue Line

Third: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Blue Velvet

FZ: Blue-veined with a rind or external coating - made from mixed, or other milks

Third: Erika McKenzie-Chapter, Pennyroyal Farm, California, Boonter’s Blue

FE: External Blue-molded cheeses - all milks

First: Kim Hayes, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Classic Blue Log

Second: Team Prodigal, Prodigal Farm, North Carolina, Bearded Lady

Third: Kim Hayes, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Bluebonnet

Third: Fons Smits, Tulip Tree Creamery, Indiana, Dutchman Breeches

A: FRESH UNRIPENED CHEESES

AH: Cheese Curds - all milks

First: Wayne Hintz, Springside Cheese Corp., Wisconsin, White Cheddar Curds

First: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, White Cheddar Cheese Curds

Second: Emily Montgomery and Delanie Schaepe, Calkins Creamery, Pennsylvania, Curdz

Third: WW Homestead Dairy, Iowa, White Cheddar Cheese Curds

Third: Marvin Sharp, Litehouse Simply Artisan, Idaho, Marvin’s Cheese Curds

AM: Mascarpone and Cream Cheese - made from cow’s milk

First: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Mascarpone

Second: Team New Holland, Savencia Cheese USA, Pennsylvania, Smithfield Cream Cheese Un-whipped

Third: Team New Holland, Savencia Cheese USA, Pennsylvania, Smithfield Cream Cheese Whipped

AR: Ricotta - made from cow’s milk

First: Team Caputo, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Hand-Dipped Ricotta

First: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Hand Dipped Ricotta

Second: Jason Radke, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Platinum Ricotta

Third: Jason Radke, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Ricotta con Latte Whole Milk

AQ: Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, and Quark - made from cow’s milk

First: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Fromage Blanc

Second: Vermont Creamery Fresh Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Quark

Second: Team Cader, Cowgirl Creamery, California, Fromage Blanc

Third: Clock Shadow Cheese Team, Clock Shadow Creamery, Wisconsin, Quark

AG: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark, and Ricotta - made from goat’s milk

First: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Spreadable Idyll Pastures

Second: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Ricotta

Third: Cypress Grove, California, Straight Up

AS: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark, and Ricotta - made from sheep’s milk

First: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, Fresh Sheep Cheese

AX: Cottage Cheese, Cream Cheese, Fromage Blanc, Fromage Frais, Mascarpone, Quark, and Ricotta - made from mixed, or other milks

First: Liuzzi Cheese, Connecticut, Ricotta

Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Ricotta di Bufala

Third: Alessandro Alberti, Alta Langa USA, California, Margherita

AC: Open Category - Fresh Unripened Cheeses - made from cow’s milk

First: Dean Egnarski, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Stracciatella

Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Russian-style Fresh Farmer Cheese

Third: Team Cader, Cowgirl Creamery, California, Cottage Cheese

B: SOFT-RIPENED CHEESES

BB: Brie - made from cow’s milk

First: Emily Montgomery and Delanie Schaepe, Calkins Creamery, Pennsylvania, Noblette

Second: Lactalis USA Belmont, Wisconsin, 1-kilogram Brie President

Third: Lactalis USA Belmont, Wisconsin, 8-ounce Brie President

BC: Camembert - made from cow’s milk

First: Mt. Townsend Creamery, Washington, Cirrus

Second: Brian Goodale. Portia McKnight, Flow Hawley and Alexander Kast, Chapel Hill Creamery, North Carolina, Carolina Moon

Third: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Michigan, Camembert 8-ounce Wheels

Third: Jonny Steiger, By George Farm, Oregon, Buncom in Bloom

BT: Triple Créme - soft ripened/cream added - all milks

First: Lactalis USA Belmont, Wisconsin, 8-ounce Triple Cream Brie President

Second: Team Cader, Cowgirl Creamery, California, Mt Tam

Third: Marin French Cheese Co., California, Triple Créme Brie

BA: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from cow’s milk

First: Jackie Chang, Haystack Mountain Creamery Inc., Colorado, Cashmere

Second: Meghan McKenna, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Meadow Bloom

Third: Gilbert Bourgoin, Savencia Cheese USA, Illinois, Dorothy Comeback Cow

Third: Jasper Hill Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Little Hosmer

BG: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from goat’s milk

First: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Mont Idyll Aged

First: Cypress Grove, California, Humboldt Fog Mini

Second: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Ada’s Honor

Third: Team Quality/Mariposa Dairy, Atalanta Corp./Quality Cheese Inc., Ontario, Celebrity Ashlyn

BS: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from sheep’s milk

First: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Hawkins Haze

Second: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Woolly Rind

BX: Open Category - Soft-Ripened Cheeses - made from mixed, or other milks

First: Old Chatham Sheepherding Creamery LLC, Wegmans Food Markets, New York, Professor’s Brie

Second: Kendall Russell, Lark’s Meadow Farms LLC, Idaho, Dos Caras

Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Ruby

G: HISPANIC & PORTUGUESE STYLE CHEESES

GA: Ripened, Aged over 90 days - all milks

First: Sam Ram, Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., California, RBCC Queso Cotija

Second: Sam Ram, Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., California, Cotija

Second: Team Emmi Roth - Monroe, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth GranQueso Original Wheel

Third: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Queso Cotija

GC: Fresh, Unripened - all milks

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Panela Cheese

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Queso Fresco Cremoso Cheese

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Queso Fresco Casero Cheese

Third: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Oaxaca

GM: Cooking Hispanic - Cheeses intended to be consumed heated or melted - all milks

First: Sam Ram, Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., California, RBCC Oaxaca

Second: Sam Ram, Rizo-Lopez Foods Inc., California, RBCC Grilling Cheese

Third: Francisco Ochoa, Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Queso Oaxaca

H: ITALIAN TYPE CHEESES

HA: Grating types (Aged Asiago, Domestic Parmesan, Grana, Reggianito, Sardo; Romano made only from cow’s or goat’s milk) - all milks

First: Dan Utano and Ferndale Farmstead Team, Ferndale Farmstead, Washington, RoundBale

Second: Almena Plant, Saputo Specialty Cheese, Wisconsin, Aged Asiago

Third: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Organic Copper Kettle Cheese

Third: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Cello Copper Kettle Cheese Reserve

Third: Team Sartori, Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Reserve Extra-Aged Asiago

HD: Traditional Regional Italian Cheeses - all milks

First: Peter Dixon and Rachel Fritz Schaal, Parish Hill Creamery, Vermont, Reverie

Second: FireFly Farms, Maryland, Bella Vita

Third: Team Saxon, Saxon Cheese, LLC, Wisconsin, Saxon Creamery Asiago Fresca

HP: Pasta Filata types (Provolone, Caciocavallo) - all milks

First: Peter Dixon and Rachel Fritz Schaal, Parish Hill Creamery, Vermont, Kashar

Second: Peter Dixon and Rachel Fritz Schaal, Parish Hill Creamery, Vermont, Suffolk Punch

Third: Kevin Benzel, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Sharp Provolone Mandarino

HM: Mozzarella types (Brick, Scamorza, String Cheese) - all milks

First: Chris Renard, Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Whip String Cheese

First: Mozzarella Co., Texas, Scamorza

First: Mozzarella Team, Lactalis American Group, New York, Low Moisture Part Skim Mozzarella

Second: A. Tabares, Annabella LLC, Antioquia, Colombia, Low Moisture Buffalo Mozzarella

Third: Chris Renard, Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, String Cheese

Third: Ben Shibler, Ponderosa Dairy Products, Wisconsin, Farmstead String Cheese

HY: Fresh Mozzarella - 8 oz. or More (Balls or Shapes) - all milks

First: Francisco Ochoa, Ochoa’s Queseria, Oregon, Don Froylan Liliana’s Cheese Ball

Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, OF Gourmet FDL

Third: Liuzzi Cheese, Connecticut, Filoncino

Third: Nampa Fresh Mozz Team, Lactalis American Group, Idaho, 8-ounce Fresh Mozzarella Ball

HZ: Fresh Mozzarella - Under 8 oz. (Ovalini, Bocconcini, Ciliegine sizes) - all milks

First: Daniel Wavrin and Ferndale Farmstead Team, Ferndale Farmstead, Washington, Fior di Latte Ciliegine

Second: Team Caputo, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Nodini

Second: Calabro Cheese Corp., Connecticut, Bocconcini

Second: Bufalinda, Maturin, Venezuela, Mozzarella di Bufala Bocconcini

Third: Bufalinda, Maturin, Venezuela, Mozzarella di Bufala Ciliegine

HB: Burrata - Fresh mozzarella encasing a distinctly separate core made from softer curd and cream, or other soft cheese - all milks

First: Team Caputo, Caputo Cheese, Illinois, Burratini

Second: Mark Federico, Narragansett Creamery, Rhode Island, Narragansett Creamery Burrata

Second: Liuzzi Cheese, Connecticut, Burrata

Second: Bufalinda, Maturin, Venezuela, Buffalo Milk Burrata

Third: Bobby Wheeler, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Burrata

Third: Arcangelo Esposito, Belfiore Cheese Co., California Burrata di Bufala

I: FETA CHEESES

IC: Feta - made from cow’s milk

First: Mike Scheps, Maplebrook Farm, Vermont, Whole Milk Feta

First: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies LLC, California, Brinza Feta

Second: Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Feta in Brine

Third: Team Nasonville Dairy Inc., Nasonville Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Feta in Brine B

Third: Euphrates Inc., New York, Feta

IG: Feta - made from goat’s milk

First: Kristy Kikly, Caprini Creamery, Indiana, Feta

Second: Amelia Sweethardt, Pure Luck Farm and Dairy, Texas, Feta

Third: Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Feta

IS: Feta - made from sheep’s milk

First: Colleen Histon, Shepherds Manor Creamery, Maryland, Shepherds Manor Fetina

Second: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Farmstead Feta

Third: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Farmstead Feta Reserve

D: AMERICAN MADE/INTERNATIONAL STYLE

DD: Dutch-style (Gouda, Edam etc.) - all milks

First: John Dirk Bulk, Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, California, Aged Gouda

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Aged Gouda

Second: John Dirk Bulk, Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, California, Mild Gouda

Second: Rudy Yoder, Farmer Rudolph’s Creamery, Pennsylvania, Sir Farmer Cheese

Third: Creamery Team, Cal Poly Creamery, California, Grand Gouda

DE: Emmental-style with Eye Formation (Swiss, Baby Swiss, Blocks, Wheels) - made from cow’s milk

First: Richard Guggisberg, Guggisberg Cheese Inc., Ohio, Guggisberg Baby Swiss Cheese

Second: Lindsey Mendes, Central Coast Creamery, California, Holey Cow

Third: Shullsburg Team, Prairie Farms Dairy Cheese Division, Wisconsin, Baby Swiss Wheel

DC: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from cow’s milk

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Fontina

First: Spring Brook Farm Team, Farms For City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Tarentaise Reserve

Second: Leslie Goff, Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont, Rupert Reserve

Third: Riko Chandra, Reverie Creamery, New York, Wanderer

Third: Riko Chandra, Reverie Creamery, New York, Tom

Third: Team Emmi Roth - Monroe, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth Organic Grand Cru Original Wheel

Third: Team Emmi Roth - Monroe, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth Grand Cru Original Wheel

DG: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from goat’s milk

First: Vermont Creamery Aged Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Bijou

Second: Team Laura Chenel - Simon Perrier, Laura Chenel, California, Crottin

Second: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Mont Idyll

Third: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Camembert 10-ounce

DS: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from sheep’s milk

First: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Wischago

Second: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Wischago Reserve

Second: Maria Schumann, Cate Hill Orchard, Vermont, Vermanchego

Third: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Sheep Milk Butterkase

DX: Open Category - American Made/International Style - made from mixed, or other milks

First: David Major, Daniel Grover, Alex Major, Vermont Shepherd LLC, Vermont, Well Aged Invierno

First: Team Grafton, Grafton Village Cheese, Vermont, Shepsog

First: Consider Bardwell Farm, Crown Finish Caves, Vermont, Goatlet

Second: Adam Rojas, BUF Creamery LLC, Cundinamarca, Colombia, BUF Halloumi

Third: Mike Matucheski, Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Limited Edition Pastorale Blend

C: AMERICAN ORIGINALS

CB: Brick Cheese - made from cow’s milk

First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team. Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cheese

Second: Ben Workman, Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Brick

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team. Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Mild Brick Cheese

CD: Dry Jack - made from cow’s milk

First: Rumiano Cheese Co., California, Dry Jack

Third: Sally Fallon Morell, P A Bowen Farmstead, Maryland, Aquasco Jack Reserve

CJ: Monterey Jack - made from cow’s milk

First: Tillamook Team 2, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Monterey Jack

Second: Kylie Schriever and Thomas Queeney, Pennland Pure, Maryland, Vona Monterey Jack

Second: Bill Hanson, Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Colby Jack

Third: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Organic Traditional Jack

CM: Brick Muenster - made from cow’s milk

First: Dave Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Muenster

Second: Ben Workman, Edelweiss Creamery, Wisconsin, Muenster

Second: Team Chateaugay, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, New York, McCadam Brick Muenster

Third: Kylie Schriever and Thomas Queeney, Pennland Pure, Maryland, Vona Muenster

CY: Colby - made from cow’s milk

First: Kerry Henning, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Robin

Second: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Marbled Colby

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team. Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Natural Colby Cheese

Third: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Colby

CC: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from cow’s milk

First: Mike Brennenstuhl, Red Barn Family Farms, Wisconsin, Cupola Artisan Cheese

First: Helen Feete, Meadow Creek Dairy, Virginia, Appalachian

First: Lindsey Mendes, Central Coast Creamery, California, Sigonas Moona Lisa

Second: Alise Sjostrom, Alise Sjostrom, St. Anthony

Third: Kuba Hemmerling and Team, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company, California, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California

CG: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from goat’s milk

First: Molly Pindell, Sage Farm Goat Dairy, Vermont, Spruce

Second: Bobby Bradds, Josh Angel and Jessie Laughlin, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Providence

Third: Vermont Creamery, Wegmans Food Markets, Vermont, Sweet 16

CS: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from sheep’s milk

First: Avery Jones, Shooting Star Creamery, California, Aries

Second: Lindsey Mendes, Central Coast Creamery, California, Sigonas Ewereka

Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Bossa

CX: American Originals Original Recipe / Open Category - made from mixed or other milks

First: Team LaClare, Affineur David Rogers, LaClare Family Creamery, Wisconsin, LaClare Family Creamery Cave Aged Chandoka

Second: Vermont Creamery Aged Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Cremont

Second: Team Nettle Meadow, Nettle Meadow, New York, Briar Summit

Third: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Flagsheep

J: LOWFAT/LOW SALT CHEESES

JL: Fat Free and Low Fat cheeses - all milks

First: Ricotta Team, Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani Low Fat Ricotta

Second: Ricotta Team, Lactalis American Group, New York, Galbani Fat Free Ricotta

Third: Justin Lowery, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Fat Free Feta

JR: Light/Lite and Reduced Fat cheeses - all milks

First: Luana Team, Prairie Farms Dairy Cheese Division, Iowa, Neufchatel 3-pound

First: Pieter Van Oudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Celebrity Light

Second: Nampa String Team, Lactalis American Group, Idaho, Reduced Fat String Cheese

Third: Steve Webster, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Reduced Fat Feta

K: FLAVORED CHEESES

KA: Fresh Unripened Cheese with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Crave Cheese Team, Crave Brothers Farmstead Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Chocolate Mascarpone

Second: Jonny Steiger, By George Farm, Oregon, Honey & Sea Salt Fromage Blanc

Third: Meghan McKenna, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Fromage Blanc with Herbs

KL: Cheese Curds with Flavor Added - all milks

First: WW Homestead Dairy, Iowa, Bacon Morita White Cheddar Cheese Curds

First: Bill Hanson, Arena Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, Cheese Curds with Flavor

Second: Pat Ford, Beehive Cheese Co. LLC, Utah, Hatch Chile Curds

Third: WW Homestead Dairy, Iowa, Grilled Steak & Onion White Cheddar Cheese Curds

KB: Soft-Ripened with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Vermont Creamery, Wegmans Food Markets, Vermont, We Be Chivin

Second: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Michigan, 3-kilogram Brie with Black and Green Peppercorns

Third: Old Europe Cheese Inc., Michigan, 3-kilogram Brie with Herbs

Third: Cypress Grove, California, Truffle Tremor Mini

KD: International-Style with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Marieke Gouda Cheese Team, Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Bacon

Second: John Dirk Bulk, Oakdale Cheese & Specialties, California, Cumin Gouda

Second: Marieke Gouda Cheese Team, Marieke Gouda, Wisconsin, Marieke Gouda Foenegreek

Third: Ron Bechtolt, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Dill Havarti

Third: Team Emmi Roth - Monroe, Emmi Roth, Wisconsin, Roth 3 Chile Pepper Gouda Cheese Wheel

KE: Cheddar with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, Peppercorn Harvest Clothbound Cheddar

First: Team Chateaugay, Cabot Creamery Cooperative, New York, Cabot Garlic & Herb Cheddar

Second: Rogue Creamery Cheddar Production Team, Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Organic Rogue’s Mary Cheddar

Third: Brad Sinko, Face Rock Creamery, Oregon, In Your Face Spicy 3 Pepper Cheddar

Third: Beecher’s Cheesemakers, Beecher’s Handmade Cheese, Washington, Marco Polo Reserve

KF: Farmstead Cheese with Flavor Added (must conform to all guidelines in Category M) - all milks

First: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Pastures with Honey and Lavender

First: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Pastures with Fennel Pollen

Second: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Claire’s Mandell Hill

Second: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Spreadable Idyll Pastures with Honey and Lavender

Third: Team Prodigal, Prodigal Farm, North Carolina, Field of Creams

Third: Aaron Langdon, Nicasio Valley Cheese Co., California, Foggy Morning with Garlic and Basil

KG: Hispanic-Style with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Chees-E-Que Brat Style

Second: UConn Creamery Team, University of Connecticut Department of Animal Science Creamery, Connecticut, Chipotle Queso Blanco

Third: UConn Creamery Team, University of Connecticut Department of Animal Science Creamery, Connecticut, Green Chile Queso Blanco

Third: Mauricio Travesi, Mozzarella Co., Texas, Menonina Pimiento

KI: Feta with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Steve Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Peppercorn Feta

Second: Steve Webster, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Tomato & Basil Feta

Third: Luke Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Odyssey Mediterranean Feta

KJ: Reduced Fat Cheese with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Matt Erdley, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Reduced Fat Mediterranean Feta

Second: Chris Renard, Renard’s Rosewood Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Farmers with Pesto

Third: Ron Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin, Klondike Cheese Co., Wisconsin

KK: Rubbed-Rind Cheese with added flavor ingredients rubbed or applied on the exterior surface of the cheese only - all milks

First: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Mayan Cocoa Coffee Rubbed Fontal

Second: Team Cader, Cowgirl Creamery, California, Pierce Point

Third: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Dill Rubbed Fontal

KM: American Originals with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team, Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Natural Colby Cheese with Caraway

Second: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Cowboy Jack

Third: Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Team, Widmer’s Cheese Cellars Inc., Wisconsin, Traditional Washed Rind Brick Cheese with Caraway

Third: Kuba Hemmerling and Team, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, Point Reyes TomaProvence

KN: Fresh Goat Cheese with Flavor Added - 100% goat’s milk

First: Cypress Grove, California, PsycheDillic

Second: Kim Hayes, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Herb Garlic Capri

Second: Carrie Bradds, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Basil and Garlic Chevre

Third: Vermont Creamery Fresh Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Clover Blossom Honey Fresh Goat Cheese

Third: Team Laura Chenel, Laura Chenel, California, Garlic & Chive 5.4-ounce

Third: Carrie and Bobby Bradds, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Fig & Honey Chevre Log

KO: Sheep Cheese with Flavor Added - 100% sheep’s milk

First: Old Chatham Creamery, Murray’s Cheese, New York, Hudson Flower

Second: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Spicy Chili

Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Garlic Herb

KQ: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (Set yogurts, Greek-style, dips, etc.) - all milks

First: Jaime Graca, Karoun Dairies LLC, California, Masala Yogurt Dip

Second: Eric Weidman, Siggi’s Dairy, Wisconsin, Siggi’s Vanilla Triple Cream Skyr

Second: Eric Weidman, Siggi’s Dairy, Wisconsin, Siggi’s Raspberry Triple Cream Skyr

Third: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Guava Stir Yogurt

KV: Yogurt and Cultured Products with Flavor Added (Drinkable, pourable, smoothie, etc.) - all milks

First: Team Weber’s Farm Store, Nasonville Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Raspberry Kefir

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Strawberry Drinkable Yogurt

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Strawberry Banana Drinkable Yogurt

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Mango Drinkable Yogurt

First: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Guava Drinkable Yogurt

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Strawberry Banana Cereal Smoothie

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Pina Colada Drinkable Yogurt

Second: Marquez Brothers International Inc., California, Peach Drinkable Yogurt

Third: Team Weber’s Farm Store, Nasonville Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Vanilla Kefir

Third: Team Weber’s Farm Store, Nasonville Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Strawberry Kefir

Third: Team Weber’s Farm Store, Nasonville Dairy Inc., Wisconsin, Blueberry Kefir

KR: Butter with Flavor Added - all milks

First: Blain Hages, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Herbed Rose Butter

Second: Blain Hages, Cherry Valley Dairy, Washington, Coffee Butter

KS: Cold-Pack and Club Cheeses with Flavor Added - with a maximum moisture of 42% - all milks

First: Jennifer Luttrell and Team, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, The Fork Pimento Cheese

First: Jennifer Luttrell and Team, Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co., California, The Fork Original Blue & Date Spread

Second: Jeremy Little, Sweet Grass Dairy, Georgia, Pimento Cheese

Second: Lance and Michele Sawyer, Red Clay Gourmet, North Carolina, Hickory Smoked Cheddar Pimiento Cheese

Third: Deana Tanner Bibb, Proper Pepper Pimento Cheese, Vermont, Proper Pepper Pimento Cheese – Classic Flavor

Third: Tony Gessler, Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, Rondele Sea Salt & Cracked Pepper Spreadable Cheese

Third: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Sheep Milk Pimento

KC: Open Category - Cheeses with Flavor Added - all milks and mixed milks

First: Lioni Latticini, Inc. New Jersey, Burrata Con Tartufo

Second: Bryan Springborn, BelGioioso Cheese Inc., Wisconsin, BelGioioso Black Truffle Burrata

Third: Terry Martin, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Blue Jay

Third: Jasper Hill Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Calderwood

Third: ALDI Inc., Wisconsin, ALDI-exclusive Specially Selected Roasted Garlic with Tomato Basil Handcrafted

L: SMOKED CHEESES

LM: Smoked Italian Styles (Mozzarella, Scamorza, Bocconcini, Ovalini, etc.) - all milks

First: Liuzzi Cheese, Connecticut, Burrata

Second: Global Foods International Inc., Illinois, Naturally Oven Smoked Mozzarella

Second: Daniel Wavrin and Ferndale Farmstead Team, Ferndale Farmstead, Washington, Smoky Scamorza

Third: Liuzzi Cheese, Connecticut, Smoked Fresh Mozzarella

LD: Smoked Cheddars - all milks

First: Warren Buchanan, Beehive Cheese Co. LLC, Utah, Apple Walnut Smoked Promontory

Second: Adam Cooper, Yancey’s Fancy Inc., New York, Hickory Smoked Cheddar Cheese

Second: Team LaClare, LaClare Family Creamery, Wisconsin, LaClare Family Creamery Smoked Cheddar

Third: Tillamook Team 3, Tillamook County Creamery Association, Oregon, Tillamook Smoked Medium Cheddar

LC: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from cow’s milk

First: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Naturally Smoked Aged Traditional Gouda

First: Creamery Team, Cal Poly Creamery, California, Smoked Grand Gouda

Second: Team Saxon, Saxon Cheese LLC, Wisconsin, Saxon Creamery Big Ed’s Smokehaus

Second: Rogue Creamery Blue Production Team, Rogue Creamery, Oregon, Organic Smokey Blue Cheese

Third: Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers Inc., Wisconsin, Naturally Smoked Aged Gouda

Third: Bruce Workman, Fair Oaks Farms, Wisconsin, Smoked Gouda

LG: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from goat’s milk

First: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Bella Capra Semi-Soft Smoked Goat Cheese

First: Carrie and Bobby Bradds, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Smokey Mountain Round

Second: Molly Pindell, Sage Farm Goat Dairy, Vermont, Smoked Chevre

Third: Smoked Chevre, Westfield Farm, Massachusetts, Smoked Capri

LS: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from sheep’s milk

First: Anthony Hook, Hook’s Cheese Co. Inc., Wisconsin, Smoked Sheep Milk Gouda

LX: Open Category - Smoked Cheeses - made from mixed, or other milks

Third: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Smoked Cerberus

N: GOAT’S MILK CHEESES

NO: Fresh Rindless Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days (black ash coating permitted)

First: Team Laura Chenel, Laura Chenel, California, Original Medallion

Second: Ben Gregersen, Sierra Nevada Cheese Co., California, Bella Capra Goat Chevre

Second: Pieter Van Oudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Celebrity Original

Third: Carrie and Bobby Bradds, Goat Lady Dairy, North Carolina, Creamy Classic Chevre Log

NS: Fresh Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days (hand-shaped, formed or molded into pyramid, disc, drum, crottin, basket or other shape)

First: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Puck

Second: John Windemuller, Country Winds Creamery, Michigan, Ashed Pyramid

Third: Team Idyll, Idyll Farms LLC, Michigan, Idyll Gris 1-pound

NT: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 days

First: Rebecca Velazquez, Barn First Creamery, Vermont, Malloy

Second: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Hanna’s Awashed

Third: Al and Catherine Renzi, Yellow Springs Farm LLC, Pennsylvania, Black Diamond

NU: Goat’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 days

First: Pete Messmer, Lively Run Dairy, New York, Finger Lake Gold Reserve

First: Anne Jones, Latte Da Dairy, Texas, Latte Da Caerphilly

Second: Anne Doe, Boston Post Dairy LLC, Vermont, Eleven Brothers

Third: Emma Bello, Sweet Land Farm LLC, Hawaii, Sweet Land Farm Goat Milk Tomme

O: SHEEP’S MILK CHEESES

OO: Fresh Rindless Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 0 to 30 days

First: Brian Schlatter, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Meadowood Farms Strawbridge

Second: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Natural Brebis

Second: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Fresh Plain

Third: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Brebis

OT: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged 31 to 60 days

First: Chris Osborne, Blackberry Farm, Tennessee, Magnolia

Second: Brian Schlatter, Old Chatham Creamery, New York, Mini Kinderhook Creek

Third: Cheese Kitchen Team, Green Dirt Farm, Missouri, Dirt Lover

OU: Sheep’s Milk Cheese Aged Over 60 days

First: Cedar Grove Cheese Team, Cedar Grove Cheese, Wisconsin, Donatello

Second: Pieter Van Oudenaren, Atalanta Corp./Mariposa Dairy, Ontario, Lenberg Farms, Tania

Third: Katie Fuhrmann, Eckerman Sheep Co., Wisconsin, Super Ewemazing

Third: Reggie Jones, Central Coast Creamery, California, Ewenique

Third: Liam Callahan, Bellwether Farms, California, San Andreas

P: MARINATED CHEESES

PC: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients - made from cow’s milk

First: Kerry Henning with Katie Fuhrmann, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The MoonRabbit

Second: Kerry Henning with Katie Fuhrmann, The Artisan Cheese Exchange, Wisconsin, Deer Creek The Night Walker

Third: Team Sartori, Sartori Co., Wisconsin, Sartori Reserve Tennessee Whiskey BellaVitano

PG: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients - made from goat’s milk

First: Gerard Tuck, CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Urfa Chili & Lemon

First: Gerard Tuck, CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Fennel Pollen & Orange

First: Amelia Sweethardt, Pure Luck Farm and Dairy, Texas, Herbes de Provence

Second: Gerard Tuck, CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Dill Pollen & Garlic

Third: Gerard Tuck, CHEVOO, California, CHEVOO: Smoked Salt & Rosemary

PX: Cheeses Marinated in Liquids and Ingredients - made from mixed, or other milks

First: Adam Rojas, BUF Creamery LLC, Cundinamarca, Colombia, BUF Ciliegine in Infusion

S: COLD-PACK CLUB CHEESES

SC: Open Category - with a maximum moisture of 42% - all milks

First: Vermont Creamery Fresh Cheese Team, Vermont Creamery, Vermont, Classic Spreadable Goat Cheese

First: Parmalat Cheese Team, Parmalat Canada, Ontario, Balderson Spreadable Cheese Spread

Second: Lyle Gast Jr., Lactalis American Group, Wisconsin, Pub Cheese Sharp Cheddar Spreadable Cheese

Third: Phil Lindemann, Pine River Pre-Pack Inc, Wisconsin, Aged Asiago Cold Pack Cheese Food

T: WASHED RIND CHEESES

TB: Soft-Ripened Washed Rind - high moisture over 42% - all milks

First: Kendall Russell, Lark’s Meadow Farms LLC, Idaho, Poco Rojo

Second: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Redhead

Third: Jasper Hill Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Hartwell

TR: Raclette-style - Aged over 45 days - all milks

First: Jackie Chang, Haystack Mountain Creamery Inc., Colorado, Snowmass Raclette

Second: Aaron Langdon, Nicasio Valley Cheese Co., California, San Geronimo

Third: Spring Brook Farm Team, Farms For City Kids Foundation/Spring Brook Farm, Vermont, Reading

TC: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - cow’s milk

First: Jasper Hill Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Alpha Tolman

Second: Team Lake Country Dairy, Schuman Cheese, Wisconsin, Yellow Door Creamery Altu

Third: Dan Patel, Atalanta Corp./Quality Cheese Inc., Ontario, Bon Secret

TG: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - goat’s milk

First: Lindsey Mendes, Central Coast Creamery, California, Dream Weaver

Second: Capriole Cheese, Capriole, Indiana, Mont St. Francis

Third: FireFly Farms, Maryland, Cabra La Mancha

TS: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - made from sheep’s milk

First: Brenda Jensen, Hidden Springs Creamery, Wisconsin, Ocooch Mountain Grande Reserve

Second: Landmark Creamery, Wisconsin, Anabasque

Third: Kendall Russell, Lark’s Meadow Farms LLC, Idaho, Bierstadt

Third: Team Grafton, Grafton Village Cheese, Vermont, Bear Hill

TX: Open Category - Washed Rind Cheeses Aged more than 60 days - up to 42% moisture - made from mixed, or other milks

First: Goat Rodeo Team, Goat Rodeo Farm & Dairy, Pennsylvania, Bamboozle

Second: Old Chatham Creamery, Murray’s Cheese, New York, 80:10:10

Third: Anne Doe, Boston Post Dairy LLC, Vermont, Gisele

M: FARMSTEAD CHEESES

MA: Farmstead Category Aged less than 60 days - all milks

First: Ashley Coffey, Tomales Farmstead Creamery, California, Liwa

Second: Ben Shibler, Ponderosa Dairy Products, Wisconsin, Ponderosa Farmstead Mini Whips

Third: Amelia Sweethardt, Pure Luck Farm and Dairy, Texas, Ste. Maure

MC: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - 39% or higher moisture - made from cow’s milk

First: von Trapp Farmstead, Vermont, Mad River Blue

Second: Revittle, Pennsylvania, Tomme

Third: Helen Feete, Meadow Creek Dairy, Virginia, Grayson

Third: Brian Goodale, Portia McKnight, Flow Hawley and Alexander Kast, Chapel Hill Creamery, North Carolina, Hickory Grove

Third: Jasper Hill Creamery, Cellars at Jasper Hill, Vermont, Winnimere

Third: Jonny Steiger, By George Farm, Oregon, Dutchman’s Peak

ME: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - less than 39% moisture - made from cow’s milk

First: Uplands Cheese, Wisconsin, Extra-Aged Pleasant Ridge Reserve

Second: Arethusa Farm Dairy Cheese Team, Arethusa Farm Dairy, Connecticut, Tapping Reeve

Third: Matthew Brichford, Jacobs and Brichford Farmstead Cheese, Indiana, Everton

MG: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - made from goat’s milk

Second: Molly Pindell, Sage Farm Goat Dairy, Vermont, Morse Camembert

Third: Tricia Smith, Ruggles Hill Creamery, Massachusetts, Greta’s Fair Haven

Third: Anne Jones, Latte Da Dairy, Texas, Latte Da Cabra Reserva

MS: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - made from sheep’s milk

First: Revittle, Pennsylvania, Shepherd’s Delight

Second: Alissa Shethar, Fairy Tale Farm, Vermont, Nuberu

Third: Jodi Ohlsen Read, Shepherd’s Way Farms Inc., Minnesota, Friesago

MX: Farmstead Category Aged 60 days or more - made from mixed, or other milks

First: Stanley Biasini, Mt. Mansfield Creamery/Molly Pindell, Sage Farm Goat Dairy, Mt. Mansfield Creamery LLC, Vermont, Starr.

CMN


USDEC, CCFN sign agreement addressing product origin, GIs

August 9, 2019

WASHINGTON — The Consorzio Tutela Mozzarella di Bufala Campana, U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) and Consortium for Common Food Names (CCFN) recently signed an agreement to pave the way for new dialogue on the protection of products of origin in the United States and in global markets — including those bearing geographical indications (GIs) — while respecting the rights of companies to produce and market products bearing generic names.

The new agreement provides greater support for protection in the United States and around the world for the Mozzarella di Bufala Campana PDO while establishing the free use of the generic term “mozzarella” to indicate a type of cheese.

The agreement, signed earlier this week by Consorzio President Domenico Raimondo and CCFN Executive Director and USDEC Senior Vice President Jaime Castaneda in Caserta, Italy, recognizes the distinctive character of the name Mozzarella di Bufala Campana PDO and its territory of production. It also recognizes the rights of all to freely use the term “mozzarella” to describe a cheese produced according to the definition provided by the Codex Alimentarius or the FDA Standards of Identity.

“This agreement will bring clarity to American and global consumers while protecting their ability to choose from a wide selection of high-quality cheese products,” Castaneda says. “This is an important step toward furthering conversations to protect the rights of common name producers as well as good faith GI holders. We look forward to continuing to work with our Italian colleagues to build upon this foundation of mutual respect for our respective food and wine industries.”

Raimondo and Castaneda also sent a joint letter to the European Commission and the U.S. and Italian governments asking that they honor the agreement and support efforts to protect both the name Mozzarella di Bufala Campana and the free use of the term mozzarella in markets around the world.

“We have embarked on the path of discussion with the main organizations in the sector in the USA, with the aim of listening to each other’s needs and addressing them in an operational, pragmatic way, and without prejudicial attitudes,” says Raimondo, who also is president of the Association of Italian Cheeses DOP. “Our staff have been determined and worked diligently and this agreement is the first fruit of a collaboration that we hope will be extended to other cheeses and bring, if anything, the resolution of long-standing problems. We have sent a message to politics: we must start from this dialogue; it is the starting point for relaxing relations. Only in this way can we avoid closures and protectionist policies.”

CMN


Sartori named Grand Master Cheesemaker at state fair

August 9, 2019

WEST ALLIS, Wis. — Team Sartori was awarded the 2019 Grand Master Cheesemaker during the Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Products Contest Auction last night at Wisconsin State Fair Park. Sartori Cheese’s Rosemary & Olive Oil Asiago earned the award by being the top-rated cheese out of all competition categories and nearly 500 entries.

Rosemary & Olive Oil Asiago is handrubbed with high-quality rosemary and olive oil, creating nutty and savory notes. Twenty pounds of the cheese was auctioned off in Lot 6 and purchased by DR Tech, Grantsburg, for $120 per pound for a total of $2,400.

This year’s auction raised a total of $51,620. The auction is a fundraiser for the Wisconsin State Fair Dairy Promotion Board. Auction proceeds fund scholarships for students pursuing dairy-related degrees and support the board’s new interactive educational display — Dairy Lane — located in the Lower Dairy Barn at Wisconsin State Fair Park.

Full auction results include:

• Lot 1: Mild Cheddar — WE Energies, Milwaukee, purchased 42 pounds of Mild Cheddar made by Timothy Stearns, Agropur, Weyauwega, for $35 per pound for a total of $1,470.

• Lot 2: Swiss Styles — Crane Farms, Burlington, purchased 12 pounds of Baby Swiss made by Shullsburg Team, Prairie Farms, Shullsburg, for $45 per pound for a total of $540.

• Lot 3: Flavored Soft Cheese — Emmi Roth USA, Fitchburg, purchased 10 pounds of Mediterranean Feta made by Kristi Wuthrich, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $160 per pound for a total of $1,600.

• Lot 4: Flavored Goat Milk Cheese — Wisconsin Aging & Grading Cheese, Kaukauna, purchased 10 pounds of Honey Goat Cheese made by Team LaClare, LaClare Family Creamery, Malone, for $120 per pound for a total of $1,200.

• Lot 5: Smoked Cheese — Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 42 pounds of Smoked Cheddar made by Shawn Sadler, Associated Milk Producers Inc., Jim Falls, for $20 per pound for a total of $840.

• Lot 7: Pasteurized Process, Cheese Food, Cheese Spread — Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 24 pounds of Ultra Sharp Cheddar made by Tom Hand, Gilman Cheese Corp., Gilman, for $32.50 per pound for a total of $780.

• Lot 8 (combined class): Open Class for Hard Cheese, and Flavored Semi-Soft Cheese — Saz’s, Milwaukee, purchased 23 pounds of Copper Kettle Organic Parmesan and 10 pounds of Dijon Herb Rubbed Fontina made by Team Lake Country Dairy, Lake Country Dairy/Schuman Cheese, Turtle Lake, for $135 per pound for a total of $4,455.

• Lot 9: String Cheese — Elegant Farmer, Mukwonago, purchased 10 pounds of Hand Stretched String Cheese made by Heydi Luis, Cesar’s Cheese, Sheboygan Falls, for $110 per pound for a total of $1,100.

• Lot 10: Blue Veined Cheese — Alpma USA, Milwaukee, purchased 14 pounds of Blue Cheese made by Team Almena, Saputo Cheese USA, for $145 per pound for a total of $2,030.

• Lot 11 (combined class): Open Class for Flavored Sour Cream, and Open Class for Unflavored Sour Cream — Saputo Cheese USA, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of French Onion Dip and 10 pounds of Organic Sour Cream made by Westby Cooperative Creamery, Westby, for $100 per pound for a total of $2,000.

• Lot 12: Low Fat Sour Cream — Cheese Market News, Madison, purchased 10 pounds of Reduced Fat Greek French Onion Dip made by Adam Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $55 per pound for a total of $550.

• Lot 13: Colby, Monterey Jack — Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Colby Jack Longhorn made by Bill Stocker, Shullsburg Creamery, Shullsburg, for $80 per pound for a total of $800.

• Lot 14: Aged Cheddar — Masters Gallery Foods, Plymouth, purchased 42 pounds of Aged Cheddar made by Dan Stearns, Agropur, Weyauwega, for $50 per pound for a total of $2,100.

• Lot 15 (combined class): Brick, Muenster and Latin American Cheese — Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Muenster and 10 pounds of Queso Para Fundir made by John (Randy) Pitman, Mill Creek Cheese, Arena, for $75 per pound for a total of $1,500.

• Lot 16: Salted Butter — Ivarson, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Salted Butter made by Team 3rd Shift, Foremost Farms USA, Reedsburg, for $25 per pound for a total of $250.

• Lot 17: Unsalted Butter — Process Automation, Green Bay, purchased 10 pounds of Unsalted Butter made by Team Weyauwega Cheese, Old World Creamery, Sun Prairie, for $270 per pound for a total of $2,700.

• Lot 18: Flavored Pepper Cheese — Oshkosh Cold Storage, Plymouth, purchased 12 pounds of Chipotle Jack made by Maple Leaf Cheesemaking Team, Maple Leaf Cheesemakers, Monroe, for $300 per pound for a total of $3,600.

• Lot 19: Natural Goat Milk Cheese — Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Goat Milk Feta made by Team Saputo Cheese USA for $50 per pound for a total of $500.

• Lot 20: Mozzarella — Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, purchased 13 pounds of Low Moisture Part Skim Mozzarella made by Roger Krohn, Agropur, Luxemburg, for $55 per pound for a total of $715.

• Lot 21: Open Class for Semi-Soft Cheese — Rock River Laboratory, Watertown, purchased 10 pounds of Baked Cheese made by Eric Schmid, Brunkow Cheese, Darlington, for $85 per pound for a total of $850.

• Lot 22 (combined class): Flavored Havarti, and Reduced Fat or Lite Cheese — Nelson-Jameson, Marshfield, purchased 10 pounds of Dill Havarti and 10 pounds of Reduced Fat Peppercorn Feta made by Luke Buholzer, Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $150 per pound for a total of $3,000.

• Lot 23: Havarti — Bader Rutter, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Havarti made by Matt Henze, Decatur Dairy, Brodhead, for $200 per pound for a total of $2,000.

• Lot 24: Sheep & Mixed Milk Cheese — Berenz Packaging, Menomonee Falls, purchased 20 pounds of Pastorale Blend made by Mike Matucheski, Sartori Cheese, Antigo, for $95 per pound for a total of $1,900.

• Lot 25: Smear Ripened Cheese — Elegant Farmer, Mukwonago, purchased 18 pounds of Pavino made by Team Emmi Roth Monroe, Emmi Roth USA, Monroe, for $90 per pound for a total of $1,620.

• Lot 26: Feta — Nelson-Jameson, Milwaukee, purchased 18 pounds of Feta made by Micah Klug, Agropur, Weyauwega, for $65 per pound for a total of $1,170.

• Lot 27: Cold Pack Cheese, Cheese Food — Saputo Cheese USA, Milwaukee, purchased 12 pounds of Swiss & Almond Cold Pack made by Team Pine River, Pine River Pre-Pack, Newton, for $350 per pound for a total of $4,200.

• Lot 28: Open Class for Soft & Spreadable Cheese — Weyauwega Star Dairy, Weyauwega, purchased 10 pounds of Creamy Dessert Spread made by Team Scott’s of Wisconsin, Scott’s of Wisconsin, Sun Prairie, for $240 per pound for a total of $2,400.

• Lot 29 (combined class): Flavored High Protein Yogurt and Unflavored High Protein Yogurt — Bader Rutter, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Vanilla Yogurt made by Steve Buholzer and 10 pounds of 2% Greek Yogurt made by Matt Martin, both of Klondike Cheese Co., Monroe, for $75 per pound for a total of $1,500.

• Lot 30: Open Class for Flavored Yogurt — Berenz Packaging, Menomonee Falls, purchased 10 pounds of Rhubarb Swiss Yogurt made by Yodelay Yogurt, Madison, for $65 per pound for a total of $650.

• Lot 31: Open Class for Unflavored Yogurt — Saputo Cheese USA, Milwaukee, purchased 10 pounds of Organic Grassmilk Plain Yogurt made by CROPP/Organic Valley, LaFarge, for $30 per pound for a total of $300.

• Lot 32 (combined class): 2% Fluid Milk-Chocolate, and Drinkable Cultured Products — Chr. Hansen, Milwaukee, purchased 10 gallons of Chocolate Milk and 10 gallons of Low Fat Raspberry Kefir made by Weber’s Farm Store, Marshfield, for $40 per pound for a total of $800.

• Lot 33: 2% Fluid Milk-White — John Yingling, chairman of the State Fair Board, Milwaukee, purchased 10 gallons of Low Fat Goat Milk made by Team LaClare, LaClare Family Creamery, Malone, for $10 per pound for a total of $100.

CMN


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Today's Cheese Spot Trading
August 23, 2019


Barrels: $1.6650 (NC)
Blocks: $1.8800 (NC)


Click here for more market activity
Cheese Production
U.S. Total June
1.073 bil. lbs.


Milk Production
U.S. Total July
18.330 bil. lbs.

Guest Columnist

Tight supplies likely
outweigh trade wars

Nate Donnay, INTL FCStone

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